Entertainment & Politics: The Influence of Pop Culture on Young Adult Political Socialization

Entertainment & Politics: The Influence of Pop Culture on Young Adult Political Socialization

Entertainment & Politics: The Influence of Pop Culture on Young Adult Political Socialization

Entertainment & Politics: The Influence of Pop Culture on Young Adult Political Socialization

Synopsis

David J. Jackson is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Bowling Green State University in Ohio.

Excerpt

Sandra Jackson

José Solís Jordán

Our collection of narratives strives to further the discourse regarding the multiple interrelationships of identity, self, others, pedagogy, and institutions of higher learning. The accounts that follow describe what it means to be a professor within the contested terrain of higher education, to break silences, and to speak of the unspeakable: the subjectivities of women and men of color as educators contending with issues of race, gender, and class in their personal and pedagogical practices. Although a number of other texts in the recent literature have included similar narratives or accounts, few have (re)presented the treatment of identity and teaching with a focus upon professors of color.

Through the voices of such women and men in higher education, we have invoked truth telling and critical interrogation of their lived experiences as teachers through narrative accounts of their teaching. Through storytelling—multicultural, gendered, and classed—the contributors to this text bring the experience of teachers of color to the center of discourse regarding identity, teaching, the politics of difference, and the creation of spaces and places through which the exercise of agency is made manifest within institutions of higher learning.

This book is about education experienced by professors of color in the academy and the persistence of difference negotiated within multilayered contexts involving administration, peers, students, curriculum, and pedagogy. Each of the individuals who have contributed to this collection of narratives has, in gaining a doctoral degree, on the surface acquired that which should have garnered them currency within higher education, as well as within larger social contexts, given the promise of education as the “great equalizer.” Yet, what the stories . . .

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