Facilitating Organization Change: Lessons from Complexity Science

Facilitating Organization Change: Lessons from Complexity Science

Facilitating Organization Change: Lessons from Complexity Science

Facilitating Organization Change: Lessons from Complexity Science

Synopsis

Looking for a highly effective alternative to traditional change models? Finally, an alternative to traditional change models-the science of complex adaptive systems (CAS). The authors explain how, rather than focusing on the macro "strategioc" level of the organization system, complexity theory suggests that the most powerful change processes occur at the micro level where relationship, interaction and simple rules shape emerging patterns. * Details how the emerging paradigm of a CAS affects the role of change agents * Tells how you can build the requisite skills to function in a CAS * Provides tips for thriving in that new paradigm "Olson and Eoyang do a superb job of using complexity science to develop numerous methods and tools that practitioners can immediately use to make their organizations more effective."--Kevin Dooley, Professor of Management and Industrial Engineering, Arizona State University

Excerpt

IN 1967, Warren Bennis, Ed Schein, and I were faculty members of the Sloan School of Management at MIT. We decided to produce a series of paperback books that collectively would describe the state of the field of organization development (OD). Organization development as a field had been named by myself and several others from our pioneer change effort at General Mills in Minneapolis, Minnesota, some ten years earlier.

Today I define OD as “a systemic and systematic change effort, using behavioral science knowledge and skill, to transform the organization to a new state.”

In any case, several books and many articles had been written, but there was no consensus on whether OD was a field of practice, an area of study, or a profession. We had not even established OD as a theory or even as a practice.

We decided that there was a need for something that would describe the state of OD. Our intention was to each write a book and also to recruit three other authors. After some searching, we found a young editor who had just joined the small publishing house of Addison-Wesley. We made contact, and the series was . . .

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