Managing Projects in Organizations: How to Make the Best Use of Time, Techniques, and People

Managing Projects in Organizations: How to Make the Best Use of Time, Techniques, and People

Managing Projects in Organizations: How to Make the Best Use of Time, Techniques, and People

Managing Projects in Organizations: How to Make the Best Use of Time, Techniques, and People

Synopsis

Your Handbook for Managing Projects In this third edition of Managing Projects in Organizations, J. Davidson Frame updates and expands on his classic book to provide an accessible introduction to the field of project management. Drawing on more than twenty-five years of consulting and training experience, Frame's most current edition of his landmark book includes a wealth of new topics, including: Managing virtual teams The evolving concept of the project manager's role Co-managed project teams The project office Project portfolios Web-based project management International project management Praise for J. Davidson Frame and His Books 'Frame has a deep understanding of the systemic nature of project management.' -Quality Progress 'The New Project Management examines the new realities of project management: managing risk, maintaining quality of goods and services, outsourcing, satisfying customers, and communicating effectively with managers, customers, vendors, and staff.' -PM Network 'An excellent book I'd recommend is Managing Projects in Organizations by J. Davidson Frame. . . . Can help you put your project management skills on track.' -Microsoft Certified Professional Magazine 'Provides an excellent overview of the fundamental concepts of project management.' -Public Productivity Management Review

Excerpt

The first edition of Managing Projects in Organizations was published in 1987. Its entry into the marketplace at that time was propitious, because it coincided with a surging worldwide interest in project management. From the beginning, book sales were respectable. Quite a few colleges and universities adopted it for use in introductory courses in project management, and training departments in organizations such as AT&T, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac distributed it to employees who were studying project management topics.

The second edition was published in 1995. Although the fundamental premises of project management had not changed since the book first came out, new developments in the business arena altered the business environment sufficiently that the book's contents needed to be adjusted to reflect the new conditions. For example, the explosive growth of Total Quality Management in the late 1980s and early 1990s put customers at center stage of all business activity. My copious references to “end users” in the first edition seemed too limiting in the new environment. In the second edition, I broadened my approach to address the concerns of all customers, not just end users.

Time marches on, and it became necessary to issue this newest edition of Managing Projects in Organizations. Of particular note has been the growing influence of the Project Management Institute (PMI) as the world's standard-setting body in project management. In 1996 and again in 2000, PMI made revisions to its A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, known best by its acronym, PMBOK (PMI, 1996, 2000). In these revisions, PMI took major steps toward updating world standards on project management practice. For example, over the years, there has been substantial confusion about how work breakdown structures (WBSs) should be developed. One approach was to focus on product-oriented WBSs and the other on task-oriented WBSs. PMI finally resolved this issue in 2001 when it published PMI Practice Standard for Work Breakdown Structures . . .

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