Special Teaching in Higher Education: Successful Strategies for Access and Inclusion

Special Teaching in Higher Education: Successful Strategies for Access and Inclusion

Special Teaching in Higher Education: Successful Strategies for Access and Inclusion

Special Teaching in Higher Education: Successful Strategies for Access and Inclusion

Synopsis

The British Special Educational Needs and Disability Act (SENDA, September 2002) will have a major impact on Higher Education and Further Education provisions. This essential book addresses the learning needs of impaired and disabled students. It suggests effective responses for those designing and delivering the curriculum, discusses flexible teaching strategies and distinctive modes of learning, and gives expert insights into how individuals may learn in special ways. Leading contributors cover the whole student experience, from academic learning to social dimensions. The book is not exclusively concerned with the SENDA; it shows how to look beyond any particular impairment to the potential of the student to learn to think with clarity and critical awareness within their chosen discipline. Key contents: * from exclusion to inclusion: the context; * visual, auditory and physical impairments; * specific learning issues (including dyslexia, autism and Asperger's syndrome); * mental health issues; * issues for pedagogy and practical guidance.

Excerpt

The education system in the UK has focused increasingly on provision of a 'curriculum for all'. Certainly in the school-age sector, access to education is clearly established as an entitlement for all individuals, and increasingly it is deemed appropriate that that education should be delivered within the mainstream context. Whatever the success of particular policies and procedures in these respects, it is clear that students are now gaining access to education where in the recent past they would have been excluded. In some areas (such as hearing impairment) ideological and methodological advances have been aided by technological advances (like the use of 'phonic ear' systems). In short, the potential of many students is now being realized to a greater extent than ever before. This phenomenon has progressed naturally from the school sector into FE and now HE.

This book addresses the learning needs of students within identified populations, and suggests effective responses of the staff in designing and delivering the curriculum. It offers discussion of teaching strategies that provide flexibility with regard to distinctive modes of learning, with individual chapters offering insights into how individuals may learn in special ways. Contributing authors cover the whole of the student experience, thus including social dimensions along with issues of academic learning.

Underpinning the book is the notion that higher education requires a level of critical thinking on the part of all students, and that there is therefore a need for all concerned to look beyond any particular disability or difficulty to the potential of students to learn to think with clarity and critical awareness within their chosen discipline. The text offers an analysis of the relationship between learning and teaching within HE, and the particular learning needs of some students. In this sense it examines the pedagogy of HE from particular perspectives within it. At the end of each of the parts of the book dealing with direct teaching, themes and issues are drawn together in short chapters.

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