Improving Assessment through Student Involvement: Practical Solutions for Learning in Higher and Further Education

Improving Assessment through Student Involvement: Practical Solutions for Learning in Higher and Further Education

Improving Assessment through Student Involvement: Practical Solutions for Learning in Higher and Further Education

Improving Assessment through Student Involvement: Practical Solutions for Learning in Higher and Further Education

Synopsis

The assessment of students an activity central to the role of any professional in further and higher education, and is an area that is the subject of constant innovation and debate. This book provides a scholarly account of the many facets of assessment, with a particular focus on student involvement. Peer and self-assessment are powerful assessment tools to add to the existing tutor-based methods of assessment and feedback, and this book is a comprehensive guide to the the methods and issues involved. Practical and accessible in style, yet grounded in research and rich in evidence-based material, Improving Assessment Through Student Involvement will be valued by all FE or HE professionals wanting to enhance both the effectiveness and quality of their assessment methods.

Excerpt

This book is about how students have been, are, and may be involved in assessment. As the title indicates, it is my belief that the process of assessment itself may be improved by student involvement, and that student learning may also benefit. In Chapter 1, we look at the seven pillars of assessment, on which the canopy of assessment rests. These pillars apply to all types of assessment, not merely those involving students. Seven questions are answered, relating to why how and what we assess, when we carry out assessments, who does the assessing and how well it is done. The final question, 'Whither?', asks what do we might do and where we might go next.

Chapter 2 poses the question, 'What's wrong with traditional assessment?' Some limitations of traditional assessment are considered, beginning with a review of reliability and bias in teacher and examiner marking. Not only is this issue important in its own right, it also has implications for testing the reliability or validity of self- or peer assessment. Typically, when students are involved in assessment, teacher marks are used as the standard against which student-generated marks are compared. Negative side effects of traditional assessment are discussed, including a brief exploration of the relationship between traditional assessment and academic dishonesty. The chapter concludes with a consideration of the role of the Internet in both facilitating and helping detect cheating, and advice to practitioners on this topic.

In Chapter 3, 'Changing definitions of assessment', conceptions are traced through three phases defined by Pearson et al. (2001); 'assessment as measurement', 'assessment as procedure' and 'assessment as enquiry'. In addition, I argue that we have already entered a fourth phase, 'assessment as quality control', which seems to be co-existing with other phases, particularly assessment as enquiry. I ask how it is that assessment as enquiry and assessment as quality control co-exist. What is the balance between them? How may we identify and preserve the best of both systems?

The question of why teachers involve students is discussed in some detail in Chapter 4, 'Why do teachers involve students in assessment?'. Reasons

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.