Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

Synopsis

In Black Sexual Politics, one of America's most influential writers on race and gender explores how images of Black sexuality have been used to maintain the color line and how they threaten to spread a new brand of racism around the world today.

Excerpt

The spring of 1964 held great promise for African Americans. On August 28, 1963, a crowd estimated at between 200,000 and 500,000 Americans of all races had marched on Washington, D.C., petitioning the federal government to make good on its commitment to equal and fair treatment under the law. As the largest mass demonstration at that time ever organized by African Americans, the march made it clear that Black people were not turning back. Despite the bombing of Birmingham's Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four young girls just two weeks after the march, and the assassination of President Kennedy the following November, the tide of history was turning. The passage of momentous civil rights legislation that, for African Americans, was designed to redress the devastating effects of slavery and racial segregation was on the horizon.

That spring, I was a sixteen-year-old high school student in a college preparatory public high school in Philadelphia. Because, along with other Black people, my parents had been denied educational opportunities, they recognized the importance of education for African American empowerment. I was one of the many Black kids who benefited from our parents' personal sacrifices as well as broader civil rights struggles. Schooled in this philosophy, I tried to do everything that I could to be personally excellent. Almost every day I carried home a pile of heavy textbooks and almost every night I worked my way through hours of homework. School was tough, but I believed that it would be worth the

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.