Faculty Diversity: Problems and Solutions

Faculty Diversity: Problems and Solutions

Faculty Diversity: Problems and Solutions

Faculty Diversity: Problems and Solutions

Synopsis

JoAnn Moody shows majority campuses, faculty, and administrators how to dismantle the high barriers that block women and especially minorities from entry and advancement in the professoriate. Good practices for improving recruitment, evaluation, mentorship, and retention are offered.

Excerpt

ALTHOUGH U.S. COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES are enrolling far more minority students than ever before, they are failing to diversify their faculty. During the 1990s and into the early part of this new century, the percentage of underrepresented minority faculty in the academic workplace has not budged. African-American, Puerto Rican-American, Mexican-American, and Native American faculty remain clustered in minority-serving institutions and two-year colleges. At most U.S. campuses, where European-American students and, in particular, European-American faculty predominate, minority faculty are rare (taking up barely five percent of the total in the faculty ranks), and they are astonishingly rarer still at the tenured- and full-professor ranks. The only progress to be found is in the increasing number of Asian-American professors (now five percent of the total), especially in science fields.

Why such disappointing overall results? The cause stems not from an undersupply of job candidates with doctorates (a popular but inaccurate assumption), but rather from unconscionably high barriers to minorities' entry into and success in the professoriate (Harvey, 1994, 1999; Harleston and Knowles, 1997; Mervis, 2001; Smith, 1996, 2000; Cooper and Stevens, 2002; Trower and Chait, 2002). What exactly is wrong, and how can it be fixed? In this book, I set forth in concrete detail how the academic field is uneven and how that unevenness makes it difficult for majority faculty and their departments to appreciate the talents and strengths of non-majority faculty candidates. I then turn to what can be done to level the field. Because majority faculty and administrators, I argue, are often unwittingly causing the problem, it should not be surprising that they must become a large part of the solution. This book focuses on how majority campuses, departments, and individual faculty members and administrators can improve their

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