Scientific Communication in African Universities: External Assistance and National Needs

Scientific Communication in African Universities: External Assistance and National Needs

Scientific Communication in African Universities: External Assistance and National Needs

Scientific Communication in African Universities: External Assistance and National Needs

Synopsis

This is one of the few current books on African higher education, and focuses on scientific research and communication on the continent. Included are chapters on scientific journals, secondary avenues of scientific communication and funding issues.

Excerpt

The main purpose of this book is to explore, analyze, and critically examine the state of scientific communication in African universities and the role played by external agencies in addressing the national needs in that arena. It assesses the means, ways, status, and prospects of scientific communication in African scientific institutions and the challenges it constantly faces.

It is pertinent to state that this book is an exploratory work that charts a new territory and a new perspective. It examines the issue thoroughly in areas no one has seriously attempted before. A book that specifically examines scientific communication in Africa within the context of external agencies is probably the first of its kind.

Why focus on scientific communication in Africa? What makes this book interesting and significant? Why assess the support of external agencies in the context of the development of African scientific communication? We live in a world driven by information and knowledge made predominantly possible by breakthroughs in science and technology. As a consequence, the crucial roles of science and technology in national socioeconomic development have, more than ever before, received increasing recognition and emphasis in those countries where most of these innovations have been conceived. The level and extent of scientific and technological discoveries and achievements have more than ever before become an index upon which the social, economic, and political viability and strength of a country is gauged.

Africa, on the other hand, has remained at the bottom end of this index both as a producer and as a consumer of these innovative products. As developments in and usage of information and communication technologies (ICT) in the developed world intensified-propelled by engines of science and technology-the scope and the culture of communicating scientific knowledge have evolved remarkably faster. Probably unlike any other in-

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