11 September and Its Aftermath: The Geopolitics of Terror

11 September and Its Aftermath: The Geopolitics of Terror

11 September and Its Aftermath: The Geopolitics of Terror

11 September and Its Aftermath: The Geopolitics of Terror

Synopsis

"An international team of political geographers and political scientists examines in a set of original essays the impact of 11th September 2001 on the foreign policies of the United States and other countries, the role of the visual and print media in covering events, and the responses of civil society and organizations. In addition to examinations of terrorism, American hegemony and traditional geopolitical theories, the essays consider tabloid journalism, web pages and environmental security, all important and neglected themes in scholarly discourses."

Excerpt

11 September 2001 at 8:48 AM (Eastern Standard Time) will be a memorable moment in the minds of many citizens of the planet, whether they lived in New York City, suburban Europe, rural Central Asia or insular South Pacific. The events of that day are forever imprinted on young and old, women and men, the powerful and powerless, the able and disabled, the working and retired, those who were at home or were in transit, America's friends and foes, those who govern and those governed. Those morning minutes in the eastern United States occurred at different times of the day and night elsewhere in the world. While some were awakening to the day, others were traveling to work or coming home from work, while still others were in hospitals, visiting friends, shopping or sleeping. There were residents of New York who witnessed these destructive events firsthand. Hundreds of thousands of others saw the second attack on the World Trade Center, and its collapse, on television, and millions of others heard about these events immediately, soon thereafter, or throughout the day. The events of that Tuesday, which were reported repeatedly on thousands of radio stations and shown on national and international television networks, were relayed to homes, farms, mines, industries, offices, airports, schools and government offices many times that day and in the days following.

In short, 11 September has become part of 'a global memory', a date and time when almost everyone precisely knew where she/he was and what she/he was doing. Because of this event 'we all became New Yorkers', as more than one commentator stated about the collective sympathy for those affected. Many Americans had friends and relatives or friends of friends who knew someone who was killed in the Trade Center Towers or the Pentagon or who lost their lives in the crash in rural Southeast Pennsylvania or as a result of rescue efforts. That this event contributed to a global memory and membership in a universal community has also meant that in the days, weeks and months following the emotions surrounding the tragedy attained global proportions as well.

The responses to the events of 11 September and the provision of meaning to 'what happened and why' remain of great concern to members of many scholarly communities. Scholars by their very nature seek answers to questions, that is, they seek to interpret and analyze 'what happened and

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