Ancient Rome: City Planning and Administration

Ancient Rome: City Planning and Administration

Ancient Rome: City Planning and Administration

Ancient Rome: City Planning and Administration

Synopsis

Rome was a huge city. Running it required not only public works and services but also specialised law. This innovative work traces the development of that law and system in the main areas of administration. The book incorporates and develops previous historical and topographical works by relating their findings to the Roman legal framework, building up a portrait of public administration, unusually comprehensive for the ancient world.

Excerpt

This book has its origins in a simple question from my husband in 1974. He was then secretary of the Scottish Office Working Party on Civic Government (which led eventually to the Civic Government (Scotland) Act, 1982), and he came home one evening with some point which had been under discussion (I cannot now remember what) and asked how they had managed in Rome. Not knowing, I said I would look it up; to my amazement I was not able to do so. For some years I continued to think that there must somewhere be a book by a learned nineteenth-century German; but if there was, he never published it, daunted perhaps by the difficulties. I was and am daunted, but still feel that the task is worth attempting. Unlike central government, local government impinges on people, particularly city-dwellers, every day of their lives.

Because the book has been so long in gestation, I confess that I cannot remember everyone who has kindly criticised or commented on my ideas, made suggestions, enlightened my ignorance, shown me where to find out more. But I am grateful, especially to all those who have been my patient audience at the presentation of my many papers on the theme over the years, frequently at congresses of the Société Internationale pour l'Histoire des Droits de l'Antiquité. More particularly I should like to thank-alphabetically-Professor John Crook, Professor Bruce Frier, Professor Bill Gordon, Mr Paul Jeffreys-Powell, Dr Lawrence Keppie, Mr Andrew Lewis, Dr John Patterson, Dr Nicholas Purcell, Professor Michael Rainer, Professor Geoffrey Rickman, Dr Alan Rodger, Professor Simshäuser, Dr Boudewijn Sirks, Professor Roberto Viganò, and Professor Alan Watson, for the discussions I have had with them, and their comments on my work.

For their hospitality in allowing me to work in their institutes (sometimes on several occasions), as well as their comments, I want to thank Professor Henryk Kupiszewski and the others

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