The New Left and the 1960s

The New Left and the 1960s

The New Left and the 1960s

The New Left and the 1960s

Synopsis

The New Left and the 1960s is the third volume of Herbert Marcuse's collected papers. In 1964, Marcuse published a major study of advanced industrial society, One Dimensional Man , which was an important influence on the young radicals who formed the New Left. Marcuse embodied many of the defining political impulses of the New Left in his thought and politics - hence a younger generation of political activists looked up to him for theoretical and political guidance. The material collected in this volume provides a rich and deep grasp of the era and the role of Marcuse in the theoretical and political dramas of the day.This volume contains articles, letters, talks, and interviews including: "On the New Left," a transcription of the 1968 talk at the Guardian newspaper's twentieth anniversary; "Reflections on the French Revolution," which contains comments on the 1968 French student and worker uprising; "Liberation from the Affluent Society," which presents Marcuse's contribution to the 1967 Dialectics of Liberations conference; and "United States: Questions of Organization and the Revolutionary Subject," a conversation between Marcuse and the German writer Hans Magnus Enzenberger, published here in English for the first time.Edited by Douglas Kellner, this volume will be of interest to all those previously unfamiliar with Herbert Marcuse, generally acknowledged as a major figure in the intellectual and social mileux of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as to specialists, who will here have access to papers and articles collected in one volume for the first time.

Excerpt

Douglas Kellner

In the 1960s Herbert Marcuse ascended to the unlikely role of Guru of the New Left. a philosopher by training who had become affiliated with the German exiles later known as “the Frankfurt School, ” Marcuse had produced perhaps the best book on Hegel and Marx in his 1941 Reason and Revolution and an excellent philosophical interpretation of Freud in his 1955 Eros and Civilization. Reason and Revolution introduced English-speaking readers to the critical social theory and dialectical methods of Hegel and Marx, providing for later generations of critical social theorists and New Left activists the tools of dialectical thought and theory-informed practice

1 For background on Marcuse and the Frankfurt School, see Douglas Kellner, Herbert Marcuse and the Crisis of Marxism (London and Berkeley, Calif.: Macmillan Press and University of California Press, 1984) and the first two volumes in the Routledge Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse, ed. Douglas Kellner, Technology, War and Fascism (London and New York: Routledge, 1998) and Towards a Critical Theory of Society (London and New York: Routledge, 2001). See also Herbert Marcuse, Reason and Revolution (hereafter R&R) (New York: Oxford University Press, 1941; reprinted Boston, Mass.: Beacon Press, 1960) and Eros and Civilization (hereafter ec) (Boston, Mass.: Beacon Press, 1955; reprinted London and New York: Routledge, 1998).

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