Human Resource Management in China: Past, Current, and Future HR Practices in the Industrial Sector

Human Resource Management in China: Past, Current, and Future HR Practices in the Industrial Sector

Human Resource Management in China: Past, Current, and Future HR Practices in the Industrial Sector

Human Resource Management in China: Past, Current, and Future HR Practices in the Industrial Sector

Synopsis

This book focuses on how human resources in Chinese industrial enterprises were managed before and after the commencement of economic reforms in China. It details aspects of human resource management during Mao's regime and examines current changes in HRM since the late 1970s. The book concludes by offering a new integrative model of HRM in Chinese enterprises which highlights the various influences on contemporary Chinese HRM polices and practices.

Excerpt

The objective of this book is to explore the emerging role of human resource management (HRM) in Chinese industrial enterprises through the examination of human resource (HR) practices prior to and during the continuing economic reform that has been occurring since 1978, the evaluation of future HRM trends, and the analysis of the impact of the form of ownership on HRM. This objective is achieved by conducting systematic research through both a review of current literature and field investigations, including case studies and surveys. This introductory chapter first provides background for the book, including the rationale, objectives and significance of the research; and then outlines the structure of the book.

RATIONALE FOR THE RESEARCH

The Third Plenary of the 11th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC), held in December 1978, was regarded as a turning point in the history of the People's Republic of China (PRC) because it initiated a major programme of reform of the Chinese economy. The meeting 'started all the processes which put an end to the excesses of the “extreme left” policies over two decades and finally led to the emergence and consolidation of the policies of reform and opening' (Talas, 1991:67). Two major components of the command economy - central planning and public ownership - were targeted for reforms (Dong, 1992; Talas, 1991). Reform in planning, also called operational reform, sought to substitute the mandatory central planning system with a market-oriented system. Reform in ownership structure aimed to change the predominantly public ownership of Mao's regime and to reform state ownership itself to establish a new form of public ownership that stimulates economic growth (Dong, 1992).

The economic reforms since 1978 have led to a 'socialist market economy with Chinese characteristics'. The operational reform has resulted in a

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.