Children, Families and Schools: Developing Partnerships for Inclusive Education

Children, Families and Schools: Developing Partnerships for Inclusive Education

Children, Families and Schools: Developing Partnerships for Inclusive Education

Children, Families and Schools: Developing Partnerships for Inclusive Education

Synopsis

Effective communication between the home and school is crucial for any child's education, but where special needs are concerned, creating good partnerships is essential. This book is concerned with home-school relations from an 'inclusive' perspective. Throughout, it highlights issues that are common across all children and families, those that reflect individual diversity and those that are of particular significance when children have special educational needs. Sally Beveridge provides debates on issues such as: * the conceptual and policy frameworks that form the background to this subject; * the fundamental nature of the learning environment that families represent for children; * the potential role of home-school relations in supporting the educational achievements of children from diverse backgrounds and with differing needs; * strategies for the development of positive communication with parents. This book offers a manageable overview of a complex topic, ensuring its appeal to students and practitioners alike.

Excerpt

This book is concerned with children, families and schools. Its main themes centre on the nature of home-school relationships and the impact of these on children's development and learning. Within the context of the home-school relationship, it seeks to highlight the importance of recognising the role of children as active participants in educational processes. Throughout, links are also made to the development of inclusive educational practice, and particular attention is given to issues relating to children with special educational needs. This chapter provides a brief introduction to the themes and their interrelationships.

home-school relationships

It has long been recognised that the quality of home-school relationships is associated with the educational outcomes that children achieve. In this country, official recognition of the significance of home-school relationships dates as far back as the Plowden Report on primary education (DES, 1967), which described partnership between parents and teachers as 'one of the essentials' for promoting children's educational achievements. Almost all government reports since then have endorsed the general principle that the closer and more positive the communication and collaboration between their teachers and parents, the better the outcomes for children. This principle is supported by the steady accumulation of research evidence that has built up over the years to demonstrate an association at an individual level between parental involvement and children's academic attainments (e.g. Hewison and Tizard, 1980; Coleman, 1998), and at a whole school level, between parent-teacher relationships, school effectiveness and school improvement (e.g. Ball, 1998;

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