Customer Loyalty: How to Earn It, How to Keep It

Customer Loyalty: How to Earn It, How to Keep It

Customer Loyalty: How to Earn It, How to Keep It

Customer Loyalty: How to Earn It, How to Keep It

Synopsis

You've read about Customer Loyalty in the Los Angeles Times, Dallas Morning News, Miami Herald, Kansas City Star, Entrepreneur, Industry Week, Marketing News, Boardroom Reports, Marketing Management, Library Journal, The Selling Advantage, Ideas Magazine, Executive Briefings, Training, Hospitality Upgrade, Direct, Quality Digest, Marketing Tools, Houseware Executive, Journal of Pharmaceutical Management, Discount Merchandiser, TeleProfessional, NationsBank Business, Modern Jeweler, Furniture Today_ now read the new and revised edition of the ground-breaking book that created all the buzz.

Excerpt

Years ago I read a comment by George Washington on the “essential characteristics or traits of the general officers of the Continental Army: character, professional ability, integrity, prudence and loyalty.” Many times since, I have thought how timeless and relevant this formula is—not just for military people, but for people in the business world and, in fact, in any professional endeavor. In the language of his day, General Washington spoke of the importance of competence (professional ability), good judgment (prudence), and the enduring virtues of character, integrity, and loyalty. Reflecting on these qualities, it seems to me that the first four attributes when acquired and sustained will ultimately inspire the latter: the precious but elusive presence of loyalty.

Over the course of my military career, I learned a lot about this thing we call loyalty. I learned that it is intangible, sometimes unpredictable, and a twodimensional attribute; an individual or an institution can engender loyalty within others, or loyalty may manifest an innate commitment to an individual or institution—which is what General Washington sought. In the business context, loyalty is delivered when properly inspired, and it is received when properly earned—a two-way street. The traits that can make that exchange happen were important to Washington's generals and are equally important in the world that surrounds us, including the business world.

In practical terms, I find it hard to imagine that consumers might want to buy insurance, automobiles, appliances, or airline tickets, for example, from companies whose professional competence, good judgment, ethical behavior, and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.