Heidegger and Marcuse: The Catastrophe and Redemption of History

Heidegger and Marcuse: The Catastrophe and Redemption of History

Heidegger and Marcuse: The Catastrophe and Redemption of History

Heidegger and Marcuse: The Catastrophe and Redemption of History

Synopsis

This short book contrasts the philosophies of technology of Heidegger and Marcus, and relates their work to contemporary technology studies. Feenberg sets out the historical and theoretical background of the debate, then discusses each philosopher's theory in turn.

Excerpt

“This is a book of many virtues. It undertakes the conversation that the later Heidegger was too haughty and the mature Marcuse too disappointed to initiate. I light of this conversation, both Heidegger and Marcuse scholars will be provoked to take a deeper and more fruitful approach to these two giants of twentieth century philosophy. More important still, the book 's brilliant readings of Plato, Aristotle, Heidegger, and Marcuse give new resonance to Feenberg 's own work and open up new avenues for his extraordinarily circumspect and incisive social philosophy.”

-Albert Borgmann, University of Montana

“The Heidegger and Marcuse controversy over technology is an exciting story, not yet told, and Feenberg is clearly the one to do it.”

-Douglas Kellner, University of California at Los Angeles

“It is well known that Marcuse was a student of Heidegger, and it is clear that the theme of technology 's deep transformation of our experience is quite prominent in both. But there has been little serious, detailed, philosophically informed treatment of this common issue in both thinkers.

“Feenberg 's book admirably fills that gap and more, illuminating each philosopher by comparison and contrast with the other, and finally offering an extremely well-informed and original perspective on the issue. (Modern technological pessimism rarely admits the possibility of the 'redemption' announced in the subtitle.) This is certainly the most philosophically ambitious and thoughtful treatment of Marcuse yet published, and is in its own right a sophisticated, compelling meditation on critical theory and our technological fate.”

-Robert Pippin, University of Chicago

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