Rural-Urban Interaction in the Developing World

Rural-Urban Interaction in the Developing World

Rural-Urban Interaction in the Developing World

Rural-Urban Interaction in the Developing World

Synopsis

Sustaining the rural and urban populations of the developing world has been identified as a key global challenge for the twenty-first century. Rural-Urban Interaction in the Developing World is an introduction to the relationships between rural and urban places in the developing world and shows that not all their aspects are as obvious as migration from country to city. There is now a growing realization that rural-urban relations are far more complex.Using a wealth of student-friendly features including boxed case-studies, discussion questions and annotated guides to further reading, this innovative book places rural-urban interactions within a broader context, thus promoting a clearer understanding of the opportunities, as well as the challenges, that rural-urban interactions represent.

Excerpt

This book sets out to reunite the urban and the rural areas in the study of development across the developing world. Most approaches in development studies - both theoretical and empirical - are based on the premise that there is a clear distinction between the urban and the rural. However, this distinction has been challenged. There is research on 'rural' activities in 'urban' spaces, urban activities in rural spaces, and on the changing interface between urban and rural spaces and on the increasing interdependence between these two realms. There is therefore a need to bring these disparate themes together in one volume.

Some of the earliest works on the interaction between city and country in the developing world focused on modernisation diffusion (Gould, 1969; Rostow, 1960). These were developed into spatial models that may be pessimistic, for example Friedman's (1966) core-periphery model, or optimistic, for example Vance's (1970) mercantile model. These influential theories are primarily focused on settlement hierarchies rather than on the interaction between town and country, suggesting an urban focus, although they are used to theorise about rural-urban interaction. Although not the originator of this concept, Lipton (1977) made a considerable impact on development studies later, presenting a thesis on the ways in which urban-based industrialisation policies can have an adverse impact on the development of rural areas. Subsequently, a number of studies looked into Lipton's ideas of urban bias, some agreeing that urban bias undermined rural development, some arguing that the distinction between urban and rural areas was rather crude and did not reflect

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