Strategies for E-Business Success

Strategies for E-Business Success

Strategies for E-Business Success

Strategies for E-Business Success

Synopsis

From the Sloan Management Review comes a remarkable collection of articles written by highly regarded experts in the field of e-business. This second book in the MIT SMR Management series is aimed at those seeking to integrate e-business into their enterprises as a way of maintaining-or establishing-competitive advantage. Strategies for E-Business Success offers a roadmap of the fundamental principles and tools executives need to Build profitability and earn a solid rate of return on investment Avoid being seduced by half-truths that can lead to critical strategic errors Create a successful Web strategy Concentrate on achieving market leadership rather than technology leadership Achieve competitive advantage on the Internet Build relationships of trust with their customers Explore the best practices of companies that really know their customers Understand the strategic value of Internet communities Implement an evolutionary approach to the development of software solutions Examine the organizational implications of an open-source world

Excerpt

The first generation of e-business has passed into history, and a second generation is now being born. the first generation was marked by high hopes, a landgrab for market opportunities, an infatuation with technology for its own sake, and a disregard for traditional performance metrics. Speed was the generation's defining characteristic, and traditional firms—slower by nature than startups—found themselves at a comparative disadvantage. As excitement about the possibilities promised by the Internet's disruptive technology mounted, dot-com stock prices rose to unsustainable levels. a crash inevitably followed, and the Internet economy was confronted with the need to deliver real value to customers and profits to investors.

This boom-and-bust pattern involving disruptive technologies is not new, of course. Although it's hard to imagine today, General Motors was once a fast-growing start-up. Between 1914 and 1920, GM's share price increased 5,500 percent as motor vehicle production surged. By the early 1920s, however, the stock had lost two-thirds of its value as profit expectations clashed with the reality of an overcrowded marketplace. Similarly, the pioneer in radio . . .

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