Using Information Technology Effectively in Teaching and Learning: Studies in Pre-Service and In-Service Teacher Education

Using Information Technology Effectively in Teaching and Learning: Studies in Pre-Service and In-Service Teacher Education

Using Information Technology Effectively in Teaching and Learning: Studies in Pre-Service and In-Service Teacher Education

Using Information Technology Effectively in Teaching and Learning: Studies in Pre-Service and In-Service Teacher Education

Synopsis

This book explores how IT can make a real difference to the quality of learning. Its approach takes account of some of the cultural, sociological and psychological factors, which influence how IT is used.

Excerpt

How can developments in IT be put to the service of learning? This was the central question that faced the collaborators in Project INTENT. It is a multifaceted question, each facet raising more questions of both a theoretical and practical kind. What is quality learning? What are the relationships between curriculum and learning? How can pupils be engaged in quality learning through the management of classroom work? How can classroom work be promoted through IT? How can teachers at all levels of experience be enskilled in IT for learning? How should the promotion of IT for learning be managed in teacher education institutions in order to support teachers in their work?

These questions are inter-connected and any one of them creates a need to know-a need to know more and a need to know different. And each required a sceptical stance: little could be taken for granted. Project INTENT was thus a research project very close to practice and a practical development project riding incessantly on the research of the participants.

The participants, all working in teacher education, evinced a wide range of IT and management experience. Some were from the cutting edge of research and development in technology and its curriculum implications. Some, including me, were novices in IT use.

Some had managerial responsibility at the classroom or course level whilst others had whole-institution management responsibility. It was a carefully chosen rich mix, a mixture that never allowed the group to stray far from the imperatives of high-quality learning and the practicalities of resource limitations-including people skills, technical skills and time and money.

The products and some of the processes of our thinking are presented in this book. The editors have carefully selected and organised the material to focus on matters which endure rather than matters of some moment in the mid-1990s. The questions always will endure. Our way of working, shaped as it was by our skills and circumstances has less permanence but, I feel, no less relevance now than it did at the time of the project. In banal terms we were collaborative action researchers promoting institutional change in the name of student learning through IT. Time was never on our side: it is not now. We worked intensely as we must work now.

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