Philosophical Issues in Education: An Introduction

Philosophical Issues in Education: An Introduction

Philosophical Issues in Education: An Introduction

Philosophical Issues in Education: An Introduction

Synopsis

An introductory book in philosophy of education produced for the beginning student in the discipline. No previous experience in formal studies in either philosophy or education is a requirement for a full comprehension of the text.

Excerpt

This introductory book in philosophy of education has been produced for the beginning student in the discipline. No previous experience in formal studies in either philosophy or education is a requirement for a full comprehension of the text. It is a product of the author's experience over a number of years of offering elementary courses in philosophy of education to first and second year college and university students who had either a general interest in the study of education or a more specific interest in becoming teachers. This text is suitable for both such groups and would therefore be useable in Departments of Philosophy as well as Faculties of Education.

Philosophy of education is a relative newcomer to the scene of academic disciplines. Only in the last few decades has philosophy of education become known and accepted as a specific branch of general philosophy and that primarily in Britain. The methodological stance taken in the new discipline is a synthesis of the tools of modern philosophical analysis, yielding rigourous thought and clarity of meaning, and the more traditional concern with examination of factual claims and justification of values, producing better arguments for decision-making in the practical world of education.

The features of this text which differentiate it from other modern texts in the field are: clarity, completeness, and currency.

Many of the ideas in this text have been expressed elsewhere in a manner which students find difficult to grasp. These same ideas are expressed here simply and clearly without sacrificing the rigour necessary for understanding complex philosophical matters. This is achieved by the elimination of unnecessary philosophical jargon, by minimal reference to other philosophers, by the use of tables and diagrams when appropriate, and by use of plain language and coherent organization of ideas.

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