The Darwinian Paradigm: Essays on Its History, Philosophy, and Religious Implications

The Darwinian Paradigm: Essays on Its History, Philosophy, and Religious Implications

The Darwinian Paradigm: Essays on Its History, Philosophy, and Religious Implications

The Darwinian Paradigm: Essays on Its History, Philosophy, and Religious Implications

Excerpt

Aristotle's Physica, Ptolemy's Almagest, Newton's Principia and Opticks, Franklin's Electricity, Lavoisier's Chemistry, and Lyell's Geology-these and many other works served for a time implicitly to define the legitimate problems and methods of a research field for succeeding generations of practitioners. They were able to do so because they shared two essential characteristics. Their achievement was sufficiently unprecedented to attract an enduring group of adherents away from competing modes of scientific activity. Simultaneously, it was sufficiently open-ended to leave all sorts of problems for the redefined group of practitioners to resolve.

Achievements that share these two characteristics I shall henceforth refer to as 'paradigms'.

Thomas Kuhn,
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962) . . .

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