The Heads of Religious Houses, England and Wales - Vol. 2

The Heads of Religious Houses, England and Wales - Vol. 2

The Heads of Religious Houses, England and Wales - Vol. 2

The Heads of Religious Houses, England and Wales - Vol. 2

Synopsis

This book is a continuation of The Heads of Religious Houses: England and Wales 940-1216, edited by David Knowles, C. N. L. Brooke and Vera London, which itself is reissued with substantial addenda by Professor Brooke. This present volume continues the lists from 1216 to 1377. In this period further record sources have been provided by episcopal registers, governmental enrolments, court records, and so on. Full references are given for establishing the dates and outline of the career of each abbot or prior, abbess or prioress, when known. The lists are arranged by order: the Benedictine houses (independent, dependencies and alien priories); the Cluniacs; the Grandmontines; the Cistercians; the Carthusians; the Augustinian canons; the Premonstratensians; the Gilbertine order; the Trinitarian houses; the Bonhommes; and the nuns. An introduction discusses the nature, use and history of the lists and examines critically the sources on which they are based.

Excerpt

As the authors of the first volume wrote of it in 1972, this book has been long in the making. Soon after the publication of the 940–1216 volume, Miss Vera London went on to make notes from printed sources for a second volume continuing the lists up to 1377. This work progressed slowly but surely, when periodic access to Cambridge University Library allowed, on her regular visits from Shropshire. In 1985, following discussions with Professor Christopher Brooke, I became involved in the project with the prime responsibility for checking through the manuscript sources. The activity has continued from then until the present time. With such collecting work there is always the temptation not to finish — there is always just another cache of documents to check, just another plea roll to consult — but it is in the nature of such fasti lists that they can never attain to anything approaching completeness. To search systematically through the hundreds of unpublished plea rolls for the period is beyond one individual's efforts and one can only aim to improve on existing lists and provide a good basis for lists not produced before. That we have achieved such a limited aim is in no small part due to the unstinting help generously given by friends and colleagues over these fifteen years. Chief among them is Professor Christopher Brooke, who has meticulously checked and commented upon all our drafts, urged us on when the task seemed endless, and has always been ready to scour Cambridge libraries and archives and further afield 'in the cause'. That the volume is now ready for publication is largely due to his continued interest and encouragement. Many others have given generous help. Some have let us have access to their notes on archives, editions and research projects before publication; others have always been on the look-out for new finds in our 'head-hunting', or have volunteered to check collections. To all of them we express our profound thanks for their generosity and kindness. Particular attention must be drawn to the great help received from the following (in alphabetical sequence): Dr John Alban, Miss Cressida Annesley, Mr Michael Ashcroft, Miss Melanie Barber, Mr Bernard Barr, Dr Julia Barrow, Dr Nicholas Bennett, Miss S. J. Berry, Dr Claire Breay, Dr Martin Brett, Mr Tim Bridges, Dr Janet Burton, Mrs Christine Butterill, Mr Trevor Chalmers, M. Robert Chanaud, the late Professor Christopher Cheney, Mrs Mary Cheney, Mr W. J. Connor, Fr Richard Copsey, Dr David Crook, Dr Christopher de Hamel, Professor Barrie Dobson, Dr Gwilym Dodd, Dr Robert Dunning, Dr Charles Fonge, Dr Trevor Foulds, Mrs Margaret Goodrich, Professor Joan Greatrex, Professor Diana Greenway, Miss Ruth Harman, Professor . . .

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