Dying to Care? Work, Stress, and Burnout in HIV/AIDS Careers

Dying to Care? Work, Stress, and Burnout in HIV/AIDS Careers

Dying to Care? Work, Stress, and Burnout in HIV/AIDS Careers

Dying to Care? Work, Stress, and Burnout in HIV/AIDS Careers

Synopsis

Based on major multi-centre research in the UK, Dying to Care identifies why work stress is a problem in health care generally, and in HIV health care in particular. The similarities and differences experienced in general health care settings and in HIV/AIDS are explored in a state of the art review of research and experience in the field to date.

This book has a practical focus, and goes on to explore ways in which the unique stresses of patient advocacy in HIV/AIDS can be addressed, identifying the best approaches for management. Highlighting the practical importance of a clear distinction between the burnout and work stress for design of strategies for burnout prevention, the emergence of the concept of burnout is described and the general historical confusion between work stress and burnout examined. This will be a key handbook for managers, physicians, nurses, social workers, health advisors and counselors working in or alongside healthcare.

Excerpt

The global epidemics of HIV and AIDS have brought forth both the best and worst in human nature. On the one hand, they have triggered reponses of stigmatisation, ostracisation, discrimination and denial. On the other hand, they have led to constructive and supportive reactions on the part of families, communities and individuals. Key among those who have responded positively to the challenges that AIDS poses are many health care workers and informal sector carers. Without their assistance and support, many people with AIDS would live (or would have lived) much poorer quality lives. Yet providing such care takes its toll and, as David Miller explains, the occupational stresses and 'burnout' associated with this work can be considerable. Dying to Care? examines some of these issues in greater depth. It offers an overview of some of the challenges that health care workers and informal sector carers have had to face, and contains recommendations for the better management of occupational stress and burnout. Of relevance to health care workers, social researchers and community and voluntary sector workers in a variety of fields, this book contains over a decade's worth of reflection and contemplation on these important concerns.

Peter Aggleton

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