Decisions and Diplomacy: Essays in Twentieth Century International History

Decisions and Diplomacy: Essays in Twentieth Century International History

Decisions and Diplomacy: Essays in Twentieth Century International History

Decisions and Diplomacy: Essays in Twentieth Century International History

Synopsis

The growing significance of international history and relations in recent years has been reflected in a growth of research and development of new courses. This collection of essays focus on three broad themes: the League of Nations and collective security, problems in British foreign policy, and European/International security in the interwar years. The book, in memory of Esmonde Robertson and George Gruuml;n, distinguished historians of the London School of Economics, contains papers commissioned from some of the most formidable names in international history.

Excerpt

Donald Cameron Watt

This book is dedicated to the memory of two members of the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science, George Grün and Esmonde Robertson, by some of their former graduate students and academic colleagues. I have been asked to write an introduction, on the general grounds that I was closely associated with them for all the time they were on the staff of the lse and shared with them in the development of the graduate side of the department, especially where the study of twentieth-century history was concerned. the development of the department and the specialisation in the history of international relations undertaken by two successive tenants of the Sir Daniel Stevenson Chair, Professors W. Norton Medlicott and James Joll, into one of the three or four most important and significant in the world, owed a good deal to their work, their presence and their inspiration.

They shared their dedication to and absorption in their subject, as they shared in the admiration and affection of their students. They were also alike, in that neither achieved promotion beyond the rank of senior lecturer, a rank too often regarded as the graveyard for old workhorses rather than a reward for scholarship. They differed in that Esmonde wrote by choice; George, equally by choice, did not. Esmonde was a scion of the old Anglo-Irish aristocracy, and from the more personally eccentric wing of that much ignored group. George, though thoroughly anglicised by Winchester and Cambridge, remained recognisably Viennese, sympathisch, Stimmungsvoll, a man who lit up every room he entered by his sheer joie de vivre. As scholars, both read voraciously. It was my constant experience that any book which covered our common fields of interest I wished to consult from the lse Library was almost certainly already 'out' to one or the other of them.

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