The Social Psychology of Inclusion and Exclusion

The Social Psychology of Inclusion and Exclusion

The Social Psychology of Inclusion and Exclusion

The Social Psychology of Inclusion and Exclusion

Synopsis

This book is about the social psychological dynamics and phenomenology of social inclusion and exclusion. The editors take as their starting point the assumption that social life is conducted in a framework of relationships in which individuals seek inclusion and belongingness. Relationships necessarily include others, but equally they have boundaries that exclude. Frequently these boundaries are challenged or crossed. The book will draw together research on individual motivation, small group processes, stigmatization and intergroup relations, to provide a comprehensive social psychological account of social inclusion and exclusion.

Excerpt

This book draws together social psychological theory and research on social inclusion and exclusion. The rationale for the book is to understand inclusion and exclusion at different levels of explanation, and as involving different types of social psychological process. This chapter describes the central points made by each of the other chapters, and highlights key conclusions from each about evidence and its practical implications. This evidence is drawn together and provides the basis for an integrative conceptual framework that distinguishes features of social inclusion in terms of i) different levels of exclusionary relationship, ii) different modes of exclusion, and iii) different dynamics of exclusion within the relationship.

This book is about the social psychological phenomenology and dynamics of social inclusion and exclusion. We take as our starting point the assumption that social life is played out within a framework of relationships within which people seek inclusion and belongingness. Relationships necessarily include people, but they also have boundaries that by definition exclude other people. Frequently these boundaries are challenged or crossed. For example, families gain and lose new members through birth, death, marriage, and divorce; schools gain and lose students by virtue of time and age; adolescent peer groups hold the potential to enhance or to jeopardize the identities of their members; sports teams select and reject players as a function of ability and performance; judicial and political decisions are often intended to create the conditions for fairness, welfare, peace, but these decisions are influenced by the group's way of dealing with divergences and disagreement. At a macro-social level, countries may attract and repel individuals on the basis of race, ethnicity,

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