Doctrines of Development

Doctrines of Development

Doctrines of Development

Doctrines of Development

Excerpt

The doctrine of development, as it appears in this book, embodies the intent to develop. It is the question 'What is development?' that makes the existence of intentions to develop obvious. This is so if only because responses to the question of development usually present an image of something created anew, or improved, or renewed, or of the unfolding of potential which has the capacity to exist but which presently does not do so. Yet, to intend to develop does not necessarily mean that development will result from any particular action undertaken in the name of development. However, the existence of an intent to develop does mean that it is believed that it is possible to act in the name of development and that it is believed that development will follow from actions deemed desirable to realise an intention of development. An intention to develop becomes a doctrine of development when it is attached, or when it is pleaded that it be attached, to the agency of the state to become an expression of state policy.

When, as is often the case, the question 'What is intended by development?' is confused with the question 'What is development', an intention to develop is routinely confused with an immanent process of development. In its classical origin, and not only in ancient Greece, development was understood as a natural process in which phases of renewal, expansion, contraction and decomposition followed each other sequentially according to a perpetually recurrent cycle. In the modern world, a world in which it is artifice rather than nature that provides the analogue for the understanding of movement, development has increasingly come to refer to a discontinuous process in which destruction and renewal are simultaneous, as much as sequential. However, the essential unity of creation and destruction contained within the process of development has not changed; it still involves destruction. If we take the development of real-estate as a commonplace example of a process of development, we intuitively know that the property

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