Organizing Black America: An Encyclopedia of African American Associations

Organizing Black America: An Encyclopedia of African American Associations

Organizing Black America: An Encyclopedia of African American Associations

Organizing Black America: An Encyclopedia of African American Associations

Excerpt

In a 1944 article in the American Historical Review, historian Arthur M. Schlesinger traced the history of American voluntary organizations. Pointing to a profusion of associations that penetrated “nearly every aspect of American life, ” Schlesinger concluded that America was “a Nation of Joiners” (“Biography of a Nation of Joiners, ” vol. L, no. 1 [October 1944]: 1-25). While Schlesinger's study focussed on organizations with white memberships, his conclusion applies equally to African Americans.

Throughout American history, African Americans have established a multitude of religious, professional, business, political, recreational, educational, secret, social, cultural, and mutual aid associations. Frequently ignored by historians, these voluntary organizations served a variety of purposes and pursued diverse goals. Yet all of them provided important services to the black community and played a crucial role in the struggle for freedom, racial advancement, and equality.

Many black associations were the product of the racism that resulted in the exclusion of African Americans from the majority of the nation's white-controlled associations. In response, African Americans founded organizations that paralleled those of their white counterparts. Black medical practitioners, for example, launched the National Medical Association because the American Medical Association excluded them from membership. During the second half of the twentieth century, many of these black-initiated associations ceased to exist when white-dominated organizations started to desegregate and open their ranks to black members. While African Americans joined these previously all-white organizations, they often established black caucuses to assure the proper representation of their interests within the larger associations.

Although African Americans established numerous associations in response to racism, discrimination, and segregation, other organizations were the product of the black community's expression of racial solidarity and an assertion of self-determination. Providing services and programs that addressed the . . .

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