Archetype, Attachment, Analysis: Jungian Psychology and the Emergent Mind

Archetype, Attachment, Analysis: Jungian Psychology and the Emergent Mind

Archetype, Attachment, Analysis: Jungian Psychology and the Emergent Mind

Archetype, Attachment, Analysis: Jungian Psychology and the Emergent Mind

Synopsis

Archetype, Attachment, Analysis is a well-researched presentation of new material that offers a revision and reinterpretation of Jung's archetypal hypothesis. The author's ground breaking new exploration of expanding knowledge from other disciplines such as cognitive science and developmental psychology, and attachment theory and research evidence sheds important new light on Jungian theory and practice. Using information gathered through laboratory investigations and natural observational studies Jean Knox brings the notion of archetypes up to date and considers the implications of new paradigms for clinical work with patients. This book will become essential reading for all professionals and students of analytical psychology.

Excerpt

It is impossible to understand contemporary analytical psychology and psychoanalysis without knowing something of the fault lines that characterized the early days of depth psychology. In geology, tension builds where segments of the earth's crust are moving in different directions from each other, creating fault lines which give rise to sudden and violent seismic shifts. It is a metaphor which seems particularly appropriate to the world of depth psychology, which has experienced many such earthquakes in its history. The first of these occurred in 1913 when, after a period of increasing tension as Freud and Jung moved in different directions, they finally severed their relationship, creating a rupture between psychoanalysis and analytical psychology that persists to this day (Hayman 1999:164). Furthermore, within each school, further fault lines have developed so that a multiplicity of theories, trainings and clinical practice sit uneasily alongside each other and occasionally give rise to further violent fractures. Within analytical psychology, these fault lines, marking major divisions in theory and practice, have been extensively mapped in Samuels' account of the main theoretical and clinical distinctions between the archetypal, classical and developmental schools and in Kirsch's history of the Jungians (Samuels 1985; Kirsch 2001).

The dilemma, which faces every practising analyst and psychotherapist, is that our clinical work requires both a highly developed hermeneutic understanding, a capacity to relate to and explore the subjective meaning of a patient's conscious and unconscious communications, and also a reasonable grasp of the current scientific evidence about the information-processing mechanisms that underpin subjective experience and meaning. The art of being an analyst requires us to attend to the intuitive, poetic, symbolic narrative

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