Teachers and Football: Schoolboy Association Football in England, 1885-1915

Teachers and Football: Schoolboy Association Football in England, 1885-1915

Teachers and Football: Schoolboy Association Football in England, 1885-1915

Teachers and Football: Schoolboy Association Football in England, 1885-1915

Synopsis

The 1870 Education Act that opened up elementary education for all children contained no provision for outdoor games. This book explains how teachers, through the elementary school football association, introduced boys to organised football as an out-of-school activity. The influence and significance of this work, insofar as it relates to the elementary school curriculum and the growth of professional and amateur football are explored in detail, including: * How ideological commitments and contemporary concerns for the physical welfare of children in cities may have led teachers to promote schoolboy football when it was not permitted during school hours. * The extent to which out of school organised football may have led to outdoor games being accepted as part of the school curriculum * How elementary school football in London in the late nineteenth century influenced the development of the amateur game. This is a fascinating account of the origins of schoolboy football and the factors that have influenced its development and the consequences and benefits that have followed not only for school football but for sport in schools and communities as a whole.

Excerpt

This chapter examines the development of elementary-school football from the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, through the Edwardian era up to the First World War. the main focus of the chapter is on how changes relating to the organisation and control of elementary-school education and in attitudes towards the physical welfare of children influenced the development of schoolboy football. a subsidiary focus is on the football careers of four players who had been prominent in London elementary-school football. the section “The End of the School Boards” traces the effects on schoolboy football of developments in elementary-school education arising from the growth of higher elementary and central schools and the transfer of elementary education from school boards to municipal and local councils. the section “The Physical Welfare of Children and Outdoor Games in Elementary Schools” examines how concerns about the physical welfare of children and the success of SFAs created a climate of opinion favourable to the introduction of outdoor games into the elementary-school curriculum. in the section “Four Players”, the football careers of four London boys of the period are traced from schoolboy through to adult football and an attempt is made to assess the benefits of their early introduction to the game in an educational context.

The end of the school boards

The need for the lsfa to change the age groups for its major competitions and offer a new event for older pupils in 1912 had its origin in the greater number of pupils in the London area who, due to the improved standard of schooling, were progressing more rapidly through the six Standards in the elementary schools. the issue of rapid progress through Standards was partly addressed by introducing additional 'specific' subjects, like mathematics and some of the sciences, into the elementary-school curriculum and by the formation of a seventh Standard in 1882. in schools where large numbers of

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