Terrorism and Guerrilla Warfare: Forecasts and Remedies

Terrorism and Guerrilla Warfare: Forecasts and Remedies

Terrorism and Guerrilla Warfare: Forecasts and Remedies

Terrorism and Guerrilla Warfare: Forecasts and Remedies

Synopsis

Terrorism and guerrilla warfare are increasingly common in many countries of the world. This book examines the current state of terrorism and guerrilla warfare and indicates how they may develop in the future. It sets out the different kinds of terrorism and guerrilla warfare and discusses in detail the various types of weapons and techniques favoured by terrorists, assessing for each the latest technological changes and their effects. It looks at intelligence, propaganda and communications. It explores the tactics and strategy of terrorists and guerrillas and surveys the methods currently used and being developed for countering their activities. Throughout the author illustrates the points made with examples from around the world.

Excerpt

I had my mind directed to the future of terrorism in April 1981, when 22 SAS Regiment, in the wake of their triumph at Princes Gate the previous year, invited me to speak to their annual study period about how I saw terrorism developing in the coming ten years. This invitation was both a compliment and a challenge. Characteristically the SAS were a highly stimulating audience (there were about 200 of them there) and I learned a lot from their lively cross-examination. They are the best of all practitioners in this field, so when Peter Sowden first suggested in 1983 that I should write this book, I already had some preliminary ideas. I was, however, committed to four other books, then in various stages from early research to proof-correcting, so I turned my antennae to the subject during this enforced five-year gestation period, while the other four books came to publication in 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987.

I began detailed research in 1985, helped by one of my former students, Shelagh Macleod, then on her way to selection for commission in the army. Her grasp of both weapons and electronics was a great asset. We were greatly helped by the Royal Military College of Science (especially Dan Raschen); also the Royal School of Military Engineering (especially Alec Wright and John Wyatt), who train the bomb search teams for Northern Ireland and lead the world in research of techniques in this field.

Ian Hogg, editor of Jane's Infantry Weapons, took enormous trouble on my behalf in both conversation and correspondence. Professor Richard Gregory of Bristol University, Dr John Hulbert of Cogitaire, and Superintendent David Webb of the Devon and Cornwall Constabulary gave me a fascinating insight into the microelectronics revolution, and its application to fighting terrorism and crime. Of the designers and manufacturers, Ferranti, Heckler and Koch, and Miriad International were especially help-ful. On the political side I again went to see the best-Dr Peter

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.