A Handbook of Greek Mythology: Including Its Extension to Rome

A Handbook of Greek Mythology: Including Its Extension to Rome

A Handbook of Greek Mythology: Including Its Extension to Rome

A Handbook of Greek Mythology: Including Its Extension to Rome

Synopsis

In this new and substantially revised edition of H. J. Rose's classic survey and analysis of the evolution and tradition of Greek myth, Robin Hard adds various features which bring the work up-to-date with contemporary scholarship and address the needs of students. • a new preface analysing and contextualising H. J. Rose's attitude to myth • a new chapter devoted to the epic and other poetic sources of the myths, narrative prose mythography and the various forms of rationalisation • a new chapter examining the relationship between the different myths of Gods and heroes, with genealogical tables. Robin Hard shows how the myths of individual families and distinct locations hold together to form a coherent pseudo-historical pattern • extensively revises and simplifies notes • a new annotated bibliography. A Handbook of Greek Mythology presents a invaluable and user-friendly guide to the myths and legends of ancient Greece - their genesis, sources, development and significance.

Excerpt

AS a teacher of Classics I have often felt handicapped by the lack of a book of moderate length, containing an accurate account of Greek mythology, in accordance with the results of modern research. This work is an attempt to supply that want. It claims no originality, being frankly a compilation from such standard works as Roscher's Lexikon, Preller-Robert, and others named in the Bibliography. I have, however, in all cases examined the original authorities and hope that the references given will be found accurate and to the point; experience of the shortcomings of others in these respects forbids me to hope that they are faultless.

I have had in mind three classes of readers. Firstly, the student, whether of ancient or of modern literature, who wants an outline knowledge of the subject, may content himself with reading the matter set out in large print; he will thus acquaint himself with those stories of gods and heroes which were commonly known and more or less believed in the classical epoch by Greeks. Secondly, those who want more detail will find, in the paragraphs in smaller type, a number of obscure, late, or purely local stories, told perhaps in a single Greek city or district. or appearing for the first time in some Roman author. Thirdly, the notes at the ends of the chapters will give the reader who wishes to embark on a thorough study of mythology a clue to further researches.

The great problem in such a work as this is one of omission. I have tried to solve it by leaving out all those persons who have no story worth telling, -warriors who appear in an epic only to be killed; gods worshipped in some obscure corner, whose myth, if ever they had one, is now lost; heroes who exist but to provide a legendary founder for some city, and the like. Whether I have chosen judiciously is for those versed in the subject to decide, or perhaps rather for those who use this book as a source of information. Criticisms will be welcomed from either.

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