Jung and the Post-Jungians

Jung and the Post-Jungians

Jung and the Post-Jungians

Jung and the Post-Jungians

Excerpt

This book evolved in my mind in three stages, each emerging from its predecessor. My original intention was to write of the way analytical psychology has developed since Jung's death in 1961. But to achieve that it would be necessary to indicate the starting point for the various post-Jungians whose work I planned to discuss. Therefore the second theme came into being: a critical presentation of Jung's own work. At that stage, there seemed a risk that the project might become too parochial and it felt appropriate to bring in the numerous parallels which exist between Jungian and post-Jungian analytical psychology and psychoanalysis. This third theme spawned its own offspring: an attempt to envision Jung as a pioneer, even the main precursor of changes in psychoanalytic theory and practice since the 1930s. Though Jung's direct influence was slight, I felt that this attempt might help dispel once and for all the credibility gap which has surrounded Jung.

It is impossible to summarise other writers without doing some violence to their views. I can only apologise for this now and add that my hope is to encourage readers eventually to find post-Jungian writings in their original form, if they have not already done so.

This book is not an exercise in psychobiography. I have not asked any of the writers mentioned for information regarding themselves or their relation to Jung. This is because there have been numerous scholarly attempts to show the connections between Jung's life and his work by examining the basic texts now available, such as his autobiography, his letters and the correspondence with Freud. I have been more concerned with questions of validity and applicability.

There have been long-standing obstacles to Jungian psychology acquiring any recognition in either the wider culture or the inner circles of the helping professions, and these are discussed in detail in this book. But recently something has happened to change this state of affairs. There are now over 1,000 Jungian analysts worldwide and the number increases at a great rate; likewise, there are training centres in all the major Western countries. Jungian books sell well and, in many places, Jungian analysts and psychotherapists co-exist in a relatively trusting and mutually supportive manner with psychoanalysts. Analytical psychology has become more respectable.

In the helping professions (and particularly in analysis, psychotherapy, counselling and casework) Jung's ideas are being used in a routine and down-to-earth way. It is precisely the combination of the sublime and the universal

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