Gender, Work, and Tourism

Gender, Work, and Tourism

Gender, Work, and Tourism

Gender, Work, and Tourism

Synopsis

Tourism is one of the most important economic activities in the world, employing large numbers of women in industrialized and developing countries. Gender, Work and Tourism examines the central role played by women in tourism. It discusses the nature of their work and the ways in which tourism creates tensions between the attitude and conduct of tourists and the beliefs and behaviour of local women. By studying a range of tourist destinations across the world, Gender, Work and Tourism demonstrates how women have been excluded from some occupations and how their work in others is associated with ideologies of gender and social sexuality. Gender, Work and Tourism integrates the themes of gender, work and tourism, linking theoretical literature on gender and work with studies of gendered work in tourism. It will make a major contribution to the study of women's roles in the tourism industry.

Excerpt

M. Thea Sinclair

Underlying the images of hedonism and leisure which are commonly associated with tourism is a large amount of work. Holiday-makers engage in tourism to escape from their daily tasks and routines but their leisure and entertainment, along with the services provided for business and special interest tourists, are premised on the labour provided by workers in the tourism industry. The divide between incoming tourists and those working in the industry is particularly acute in many tourist destination areas, where contrasting lifestyles of leisure and work are compounded by considerable differences in income and wealth. The tourism industry is characterized by further divisions between the workers themselves, notably in the form of gender and race. While not as evident as those between tourism consumers and producers, such divisions are significant not only for the operation of tourism but for the relative incomes, status and power of those involved in it. Paradoxically, there has been little attention to these issues to date, the main exceptions being the collections edited by Kinnaird and Hall (1994) and Swain (1995) and a number of individual articles and chapters, particularly in the area of prostitution tourism.

This book aims to contribute to the literature on tourism and gender using a comparative international perspective, integrating the relatively unrelated literatures on tourism, gender and work. The chapters consider a range of tourist locations: the UK, Northern Cyprus, Bali, Mexico, the Philippines and Japan. The studies in the book examine the gendered structure of the tourism workforce in the different international destinations and help to explain the processes which reinforce or challenge gendered patterns of work,

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