Neo-Piagetian Theories of Cognitive Development: Implications and Applications for Education

Neo-Piagetian Theories of Cognitive Development: Implications and Applications for Education

Neo-Piagetian Theories of Cognitive Development: Implications and Applications for Education

Neo-Piagetian Theories of Cognitive Development: Implications and Applications for Education

Synopsis

Educationalists espoused Piaget's theory of cognitive development with enthusiasm in the late 1960's. Since then however, Piaget's models have been widely criticised and have fallen out of favour. The Neo-Piagetians, as they have been dubbed, attempt to preserve the best of traditional Piagetian ideas and combine them with the results of recent empirical research. In this collection, an international array of the world's leading scholars show how new research and diverse research traditions can be reconciled with many of Piaget's models to provide useful insights into many of the problems faced by researchers in educational settings.

Excerpt

An important development during the past decades in research on learning, development, and instruction has been the increasing tendency towards integration of different subfields of psychology as well as between theory-oriented inquiry and research aiming at the improvement of practice. The present volume, which mainly brings together in a coherent way the papers presented in three symposia organized at the Third European Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (Madrid, September 1989), reflects both trends.

Echoing in some way the title of an article by Gardner and Hatch (1989) on 'Multiple intelligences go to school' which illustrates the rapprochement between differential psychology and education, this volume is symptomatic of the interest of developmental psychology in the improvement of education. But this publication also endorses Weinert's (1989) observation that 'the artificial frontiers erected between developmental psychology, learning research, studies of individual differences, and educational psychology are gradually losing their traditional importance' (p. 6). This blurring of the boundaries between those sub-disciplines of psychology is certainly a typical feature of European research (see also Shuell 1987), and is, for example, well illustrated in the collaborative work of Demetriou, Efklides, and Gustafsson reported in the present volume.

Bridging the gap between theory building, on the one hand, and contributing to the improvement of educational practice, on the other, has become more and more prominent in research on learning, development, and teaching. This book contributes to this bridging in two different ways. First of all, by the set of papers presented in the last part, that focuses on domain-related developmental aspects that are relevant for instruction in different subject-matter fields. Second, by presenting, in Part II, a series of intervention studies on inducing cognitive change. This also illustrates a powerful characteristic of European research on the acquisition of knowledge and skills, namely, the use of teaching experiments in ecologically valid settings as a research strategy.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.