Object Relations, the Self, and the Group: A Conceptual Paradigm

Object Relations, the Self, and the Group: A Conceptual Paradigm

Object Relations, the Self, and the Group: A Conceptual Paradigm

Object Relations, the Self, and the Group: A Conceptual Paradigm

Synopsis

This established text presents a framework for integrating group psychology with psychoanalytic theories of object relations, the ego and the self, through the perspective of general systems theory. It defines and discusses key constructs in each of the fields and illustrates them with practical examples.

Excerpt

It has been seven years since the original publication in 1987 of Object Relations, the Self, and the Group, and the printing now of a paperback edition gives both the authors and readers an opportunity to appraise how well it has stood this brief test of time. Developments in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy have moved along at a rapid pace, adjusting to advances in knowledge as well as the exigencies of changes in the health care system and the rich international exchange of information and ideas that has occurred in recent years. Is Object Relations, the Self, and the Group still current and contemporary? If the authors were rewriting it today, what changes might they make?

When published in 1987, the book was, for the most part, highly praised, and it created a small stir in group dynamics and group therapy circles. Members of the Group Analytic Institute faculties in Europe found the book innovative and scholarly and used it as a teaching text. Book reviewers in the US praised the book's comprehensive, in-depth understanding of psychodynamic, group psychology, and the book was regarded as 'state of the art' in that respect. Systems theorists such as Jim Durkin and Larry Gould considered the book to be a genuine breakthrough in integrating object relations theory and systems approaches. The work seemed to succeed in its goal: to explore and update a range of inter-relationships between individual and group psychology with object relations theory and self psychology as a foundation.

In the seven years that have passed, there have been significant advances in psychoanalysis and group therapy, and also some 'old wine in new bottles'. Colleagues will disagree with us and amongst each other as to what is real change and what is simply a rephrasing of what has come before. There follows a summary of our view,

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.