Freud, Jung, Klein -- The Fenceless Field: Essays on Psychoanalysis and Analytical Psychology

Freud, Jung, Klein -- The Fenceless Field: Essays on Psychoanalysis and Analytical Psychology

Freud, Jung, Klein -- The Fenceless Field: Essays on Psychoanalysis and Analytical Psychology

Freud, Jung, Klein -- The Fenceless Field: Essays on Psychoanalysis and Analytical Psychology

Synopsis

A friend of Jung and Winnicott, Michael Fordham was co-editor of the collected works of Jung and the first editor of the Journal of Anaylytical Psychology . Freud, Jung, Klein - The Fenceless Field draws together his key writings on the relationship between psychoanalysis and analytical psychology.

Excerpt

When the essay on Freud, Jung and Klein was first shown to me, the significance and fascination of it was obvious, but equally it was clear that it was not long enough in itself to form a book. Michael Fordham agreed that other papers of his should be collected around the subject to form a coherent whole.

The first part of the book may be seen as the history of that area of analytic thought that led up to his own work. Parts II and III may be seen as amplifying that journey, from the chapter on Jung's researches originally published in 1945, to his 1993 review of Donald Meltzer's The Claustrum.

Running through the book is the interdependence of clinical experience and theory. The clinical experience in the analytic setting is a common field that allows theories from whatever school to be tested. The book therefore crosses boundaries not only between the work of Freud and Jung, but also between theorists within those schools.

In the 1930s, the young Michael Fordham visited Jung in Zurich to question him about his understanding of transference, a visit which Fordham has described as a heroic endeavour. After the Second World War, Jung for his part listened critically to Fordham's ideas without being dictatorial or heavy-handed. One of those ideas was Fordham's theory of a primary self that deintegrates and reintegrates. Fordham found Jung receptive by then to the proposition that individuation is a lifelong process, not confined to the second half of life. As the following articles were written at different times, the theory of a primary self is repeated in several places. Rather than edit most of them out, I have left several of the repetitions in situ so that the reader may have different ways of approaching this fundamental but complex theory. Through it, Michael Fordham has given analytical psychology a theory of development for infancy and childhood that Jung left open.

R.H.

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