Schizophrenia: A New Guide for Clinicians

Schizophrenia: A New Guide for Clinicians

Schizophrenia: A New Guide for Clinicians

Schizophrenia: A New Guide for Clinicians

Synopsis

Contains guidelines and recommendations-in tabular form for quick reference-on patient evaluation and optimal treatment for long-term care! Based on evidence from recent systematic clinical research studies, this comprehensive reference provides the latest information on the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of schizophrenia-highlighting modern diagnostic tools and current therapeutic advances for the prevention of hallucinations, thought disorganization, and negative symptoms. Emphasizes family education and psychoeducation, and community-centered treatments for patient rehabilitation and adherence to management programs! With consideration of the chronic nature of the disease, "Schizophrenia" details the effect of substance abuse and drug dependence on rehabilitation and treatment second-generation antipsychotic drugs, including olanzapine, quetiapine, risperiodone, and ziprasidone contemporary strategies to prevent depression and suicide patterns of patient compliance and noncompliance violence and forensic hospitalization. With over 600 useful references, "Schizophrenia" is an essential source for psychiatrists and psychopharmacologists, clinical neurologists and neuropsychopharmacologists, psychologists, primary care physicians, social workers, nurses, and graduate and medical school students in these disciplines.

Excerpt

Schizophrenia remains one of the most common psychiatric disorders, affecting approximately 1% of the world's population. It occurs with a similar frequency in all races and cultures, and while men and women are equally likely to be affected by schizophrenia, its age of onset is earlier and its severity is greater in men. If left untreated, schizophrenia is almost always a lifelong, disabling disease.

Despite the seriousness of this disease, over the past decade we have witnessed major advances in our understanding of schizophrenia and our ability to mitigate its disabling effects. Systematic diagnosis based on well-defined symptom categories has become a worldwide standard. An increased number of symptom categories are now recognized as being central to schizophrenia, including psychotic symptoms, symptoms of thought disorganization, negative symptoms, and mood instability. In addition, subtle deficits in fundamental elements of cognition, such as attention and memory, have been identified in patients with schizophrenia. These deficits, which may predate the onset of more obvious clinical symptoms, appear to be the major block to patients' attempts to return to school or work.

The recognition of new symptom categories and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients offers important new avenues for treatment. . .

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