Teachers as Mentors: A Practical Guide

Teachers as Mentors: A Practical Guide

Teachers as Mentors: A Practical Guide

Teachers as Mentors: A Practical Guide

Synopsis

School-based teacher education is being implemented and this book explores the changing role and function of the supervisory teacher in the classroom.; The ramifications of the changes to pre-service teacher training are enormous. The staffing of some parts of universities will be affected dramatically; the distribution of funds will change; the tasks of many teachers in school will be different as they find themselves becoming teacher educators rather than supervisors in their new role as mentors. In this highly readable book, the Fields, through a series of case studies, drawn from the UK and Australia, focus on the changing roles and responsibilities of those central to the preparation of the next generation of teachers.; Chapters consider the overall effect that mentoring will have on the teaching profession. The book looks at the skills required by teachers and, in particular, the beginning teacher; the experiences of teachers in-training undergoing education programmes; teachers' supervisory roles; and how universities will be affected by the changes.; Practical guidance is given for teachers becoming mentors and how mentoring can lead to professional development and as a way forward in teachers' careers.

Excerpt

Pre-service teacher education is undergoing change. in the last few years, the process of the supervision of pre-service student teachers when they go into schools for a practicum has been transformed markedly in the United Kingdom and is under scrutiny in Australia and in the United States. in the United Kingdom the task of the supervising teachers in schools has changed. They are now asked to be real partners with departments of education in universities in the task of pre-service teacher education. By insisting on more of a school-base to teacher education, governments are asking that learning to be a teacher be more firmly contextualised in the school than it has been in the past. This book explores what it is that supervising teachers are now being asked to do, and contrasts this with what they were asked to do ten years ago.

In England and Wales in 1992 schools and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) moved to placing students in schools for 120 days out of 180 days of the Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) course-that is, two-thirds of the pgce course is delivered in schools by school teachers, and one-third of the course is delivered in universities by teacher education staff. in June 1993 the Secretary of State published the document that outlined how the programs of primary teacher education would also become school-based over the next two years (DfE 1993). the ramifications are enormous. the staffing of some parts of universities will be affected dramatically. the distribution of each student's grant money will be different. Even more important, the task of many teachers in schools will change. This is the focus of this book. Because student teachers are to spend most of their pgce year with their school supervisors rather than their university tutors, teachers are having to take over much of the course content that used to be dealt with in the university. in England and Wales, teachers are finding that

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