Technology and Industrial Development in Pre-War Japan: Mitsubishi Nagasaki Shipyard, 1884-1934

Technology and Industrial Development in Pre-War Japan: Mitsubishi Nagasaki Shipyard, 1884-1934

Technology and Industrial Development in Pre-War Japan: Mitsubishi Nagasaki Shipyard, 1884-1934

Technology and Industrial Development in Pre-War Japan: Mitsubishi Nagasaki Shipyard, 1884-1934

Synopsis

This book aims to discredit the myth that has the 'unique cultural traits' of the Japanese as the key to the country's success, arguing that the more realisable foundation of long-term investment in training and research is responsible.
The book looks at the development of Japan in the pre-War period. Yukiko Fukusaku sees the achievements of this period as central to the present competitiveness of the country's industrial technology. She uses the Mitsubishi Nagasaki shipyard as a case study, looking at technological innovation and training as the keys to long-term stability and economic success.
The book has implications for industrial development worldwide. Japan's starting point over a century ago was similar to the present conditions of many developing countries and the book's emphasis on the acquisition of better skills as a key to development is as relevant to Europe and America as it is to the Third World.

Excerpt

With growing speed, as we move into the 1990s, Japan in her many aspects is becoming a subject of interest and concern. The successes of the Japanese economy and the resourcefulness of her people have long been appreciated abroad. What is new is an awareness of her increasing impact on the outside world. This tends to produce painful adjustment and uncomfortable reactions. It also often leads to stereotypes based on outdated or ill-informed ideas.

The Nissan Institute/Routledge Japanese Studies Series seeks to foster an informed and balanced-but not uncritical-understanding of Japan. One aim of the series is to show the depth and variety of Japanese institutions, practices and ideas. Another is, by using comparison, to see what lessons, positive and negative, can be drawn for other countries. There are many aspects of Japan which are little known outside that country but which deserve to be better understood.

In the latter half of the nineteenth century Japan was an 'underdeveloped' country in the true sense of the term. Ahead of her lay the incredibly arduous task of importing, adapting, developing and dispersing the technologies needed for the creation of an industrialized society. Much technological experience had already been accumulated by the time of the second world war, and it was this solid base upon which the post-war economic 'miracle' was able to be built.

This book examines in detail the ways in which technological innovation and training were developed at the Mitsubishi Shipyard in Nagasaki between 1884 and 1934. The author demonstrates that there was an impressive accumulation of technological capabilities within the firm and at national level at

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