Critical Theories, International Relations, and "The Anti-Globalisation Movement": The Politics of Global Resistance

Critical Theories, International Relations, and "The Anti-Globalisation Movement": The Politics of Global Resistance

Critical Theories, International Relations, and "The Anti-Globalisation Movement": The Politics of Global Resistance

Critical Theories, International Relations, and "The Anti-Globalisation Movement": The Politics of Global Resistance

Synopsis

This book provides a comprehensive and nuanced analysis of the 'anti-globalisation' struggles taking place around the world. It shows the complexity and diversity of these movements and illustrates this with detailed empirical studies of local, national and transnational resistance in the United States, Europe, Asia and Africa. The authors introduce a variety of competing theoretical perspectives from international political economy, social movement theory, globalisation studies, feminism, and postmodernism, explaining how activism has influenced theory and how theory can help activists to modify their tactics.

Excerpt

With this book, Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca make an important intervention in the contemporary debates on critical ir theory and the implications for concrete 'anti-globalisation' politics. in our view, their provocative and stimulating book will mark a departure from ir and ipe accounts of 'anti-globalisation' that take the theory and empirical realities as a given. Motivated by a desire to explore the intersection of critical theory and anti-globalisation practices, this book draws together insights from approaches as diverse as Marxism, Gramscian theory, feminism, poststructuralism, constructivism and postcolonialism. As such, the perspectives on power and movement that are taken in the volume cannot be easily captured under a single rubric. Eschle and Maiguascha have sought to engage their authors in an ongoing dialogue that stimulates open debate, rather than closing down possible insights into the anti-globalisation movement. Indeed, the reader will find that there are many more questions raised and explored than definitively answered in this volume. What does it mean to be 'anti-globalisation'? Is it possible to identify a singular entity we might call the 'anti-globalisation movement'? How can we best understand the politics of movement in an era of globalization? Who speaks, and who is silenced in international relations and international political economy accounts of power and resistance?

If the reader is looking for an unambiguous answer to these kinds of questions, then they will not find it here. For, rather like the very politics of social movements, Eschle and Maiguashca's book is a body of work by virtue of its differences, debates, tensions and contests, and not simply by a common stance on an emergent global civil society. Indeed, one of the common threads that is to be found woven through the contributions is the desire to root the understanding of an anti-globalisation movement in the interrogation of actual and situated social practices. As the editors explain: 'we pay close attention to the concrete political practices of those involved in the “anti-globalisation movement”. What are their tensions, exclusions and violences, and what political possibilities do they offer?' the chapters of the volume explore the discursive and concrete making of an anti-globalisation movement through diverse contexts and political practices: through spaces

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