The Falklands Conflict Twenty Years On: Lessons for the Future

The Falklands Conflict Twenty Years On: Lessons for the Future

The Falklands Conflict Twenty Years On: Lessons for the Future

The Falklands Conflict Twenty Years On: Lessons for the Future

Synopsis

In 2002, diplomats, politicans, civil servants, soldiers, sailors, airmen, historians, political scientists, and journalists gathered for a conference to consider the lessons of the Falklands Conflict, twenty years on. This volume presents the papers that were presented at the conference.

Excerpt

This is the fifth book in the Sandhurst Conference Series charting important themes for the British Army and Armed Forces and, perhaps, for the armed forces of every country in the post-Cold War era and into the twenty-first century. The first volume in the series, The Media and International Security, edited by Stephen Badsey, explores the impact of the media on conflict and military operations, and has already been well received by the defence and academic community. The second volume, Aspects of Peacekeeping, edited by D.S. Gordon and F.H. Toase, begins to unpack many of the features of contemporary peace support operations. For an institution such as the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, seeking to understand the often complex relationships present in these operations is of obvious importance. For any academic institution exploring the issues that bind and divide the diplomatic, humanitarian and military communities in peacekeeping, this book provides an exceptionally useful multidisciplinary introduction. The third book, Negotiation in International Conflict: Understanding Persuasion, edited by Deborah Goodwin, is a discussion of negotiation at all levels of command from the strategic to the tactical. The fourth book, Britain, NATO and the Lessons of the Balkan Conflicts 1991-1999, edited by Stephen Badsey and Paul Latawski, examines the broad impact of the dissolution of the former Republic of Yugoslavia, and in particular the role of British armed forces and of NATO. While it is not intended as a primer on the Balkans, it provides a survey of issues ranging from the historical roots of conflict in the region and the influence of the Second World War through to humanitarian-military relationships in the course of NATO's campaign over Kosovo. A separate section on military relations with the media reflects the continuing importance of this issue, while an analysis of the historical mythology of the region reveals how badly 'lessons' from history may mislead contemporary opinion.

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