The Violence and Addiction Equation: Theoretical and Clinical Issues in Substance Abuse and Relationship Violence

The Violence and Addiction Equation: Theoretical and Clinical Issues in Substance Abuse and Relationship Violence

The Violence and Addiction Equation: Theoretical and Clinical Issues in Substance Abuse and Relationship Violence

The Violence and Addiction Equation: Theoretical and Clinical Issues in Substance Abuse and Relationship Violence

Synopsis

Addiction and relationship violence are serious and undeniably prevalent societal problems with high costs to families and individuals, as well as concomitant costs to health care, school, and social systems. The co-occurence of addiction and abuse is a reality that has yet to be fully acknowledged and explored from either a theoretical or practical perspective. The Violence and Addiction Equation: Theoretical and Clinical Issues in Substance Abuse and Relationship Violence addresses the addiction-violence overlap by assembling state-of-the-art theory and research in these areas to document the connection and the problem while also exploring prevention and treatment. Chapters cover biological bases of addiction and abuse, personality factors in the equation, developmental, psychopathological and cognitive social-learning models, and numerous issues in clinical treatment. Also presented are perspectives on interpersonal violence and addiction across the lifespan: from adolescence and young adult through partnership, parenthood, and maturity. This book represents a primary effort to pull together separate fields and offer essential assistance to researchers and practitioners working to alleviate the combined impact of addiction and violence.

Excerpt

In our modern world, violence and substance use are commonplace. Persons in close relationships-our partners and children-are too often put in the position of victim, the recipients of aggression and neglect. While many victims recover well and repair their hurt selves, such victimization experiences contribute to subsequent struggles with alcohol and other drugs. It is further recognized that the perpetrators of abuse may be entangled in their own struggles with addictive substances. As policy makers, educators, researchers, clinicians, and other service providers, we are confronted with the separate public health issues of child maltreatment, partner violence, and addictions. There remains an undeniable need to integrate these distinct literatures so that a fund of research-based knowledge can be compiled and guide our future work. This volume exists to suggest that we are impelled to consider how and why relationship violence overlaps with substance abuse, and how and when interventions should be delivered. In reality, the violence and addiction equation is being computed on a daily basis in child protective services, juvenile justice, battered women's shelters, treatment services, courts, and addiction treatment agencies. This volume is one effort to assist us in grappling with what the overlap between relationship violence and addictions may be about.

The goal for the current volume, first and foremost, is to document this dual problem and to examine estimates of their overlap across the lifespan and subpopulations. In varying degrees, the weight of the data point to the overlap among child maltreatment, partner violence, alcohol abuse, illicit drug abuse, and polysubstance abuse. A main goal for the present volume is to direct scholarly attention to theoretical frameworks that could guide our understanding of this emergent field and inform the development of dual-focused prevention and treatment programs. Violence and addiction-related problems may exert an impact across development. In the absence of a large body of dual-focused longitudinal research, another goal for this volume is to attempt to address these overlapping problems at different stages across the lifespan, from adolescence, where partner relationships become initiated, to older adults, where violence and addiction issues may persist or emerge. Finally, attention to the clinical reality for the dual problem of relationship violence and addiction created a need to examine prevention and treatment efforts. In addition to discussing important issues for intervention, this volume seeks to profile novel and promising prevention and treatment approaches, and to present more established, empirically-validated interventions. Within this clinical reality, important contextual questions need to be addressed such as cultural differences and access to treatment, and conceptual models informing inter-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.