The Control of Fuddle and Flash: A Sociological History of the Regulation of Alcohol and Opiates

The Control of Fuddle and Flash: A Sociological History of the Regulation of Alcohol and Opiates

The Control of Fuddle and Flash: A Sociological History of the Regulation of Alcohol and Opiates

The Control of Fuddle and Flash: A Sociological History of the Regulation of Alcohol and Opiates

Synopsis

The Control of Fuddle and Flash: A Sociological History of the Regulation of Alcohol and Opiates provides a historical and comparative overview describing the regulation of the use of alcohol and drugs (opiates) in the United States, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. It explains the conditions and causes of the various regulatory regimes, such as the economic benefits reaped from the colonial opium trade and the role that duties on alcohol played in state formation. Moreover, it explores the consequences of different regulatory regimes, e.g. the shift in the supply of (increasingly strong) liquor and the professionalisation of crime, both unintended consequences of American Prohibition. The Control of Fuddle and Flash provides original insights into the political economy of regulatory regimes, and sheds new light on the contemporary debate on the drug problem.

Excerpt

The publication of this book in English pleases me enormously. Not only because it makes a real contribution to the debate on the regulation of alcohol and opiates, but also because my husband, Dr Jan-Willem Gerritsen, who sadly died in 1993, very much wanted to see his book appear in English.

I should like to thank drs Nico Oudendijk, former Director of the Department of Mental Health Care, Addiction Affairs and Consumer Policy of the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, and Professor Johan Goudsblom, chairman of the Norbert Elias Foundation, for the translation subsidies they granted, which followed naturally from their enthusiasm about the book. I would like to thank Dr D. Korf, Phd, associate professor at the 'Bonger' Institute of Criminology at the University of Amsterdam, for making the Update. I should also like to thank the translator, Beverley Jackson, for the commitment to the project and for our pleasant collaboration on the translation.

Finally, I should like to thank Dr Han Israëls, Dr Annet Mooij and Dr Geert de Vries for their assistance in preparing the book for publication in English.

Drs Henriëtte Oudshoorn . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.