Cicero's Style: A Synopsis

Cicero's Style: A Synopsis

Cicero's Style: A Synopsis

Cicero's Style: A Synopsis

Excerpt

Hinc enim iam elocutionis rationem tractabimus, partem operis, ut inter omnes oratores convenit, difficillimam.

'For I shall now discuss style, a subject which, as all orators agree, presents the greatest difficulty.' Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 8, Prooemium, 13

Cicero is our richest source of classical Latin prose. His orations, treatises, and letters run an astounding gamut of stylistic shades, which defy the common notions of 'classical monotony' and 'dead language.' A new reading of Cicero might be rewarding for all those interested in the mystery of good style and culture of speech.

The author has been fascinated by the subject of this book for forty years. None of its chapters, however, has been published in English. Of course, when reexamining some of his own preliminary studies, he realized that for an international readership all must be completely rewritten in order to reflect the author's actual state of knowledge, and avoid, as far as possible, the pretentious obscurity of scholarly jargon. To make the text more accessible to younger students and the general reader, Latin and Greek quotations have been translated (Loeb translations have been gratefully used, though not always adopted literally).

First drafts of the present book were made when the author stayed in the United States and in the Netherlands as a visiting professor. This book would never have been written, therefore, without the friendship of Karl Galinsky (The University of Texas at Austin, Texas), Christian Habicht (The Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey), Anton D. Leeman (The University of Amsterdam), and Gareth Schmeling (The University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida). At various stages of the work, individual chapters were corrected by Allan Kershaw, Rüdiger Niehl, and Francis R. Schwartz. The text of the book benefited from Claudia Nissle's untiring vigilance and competence and from the critical remarks of some unnamed referees. Harm Pinkster was kind enough to draw the author's attention to some interesting problems and publications. The author is deeply obliged to his admired friend and colleague John Velz (The University of Texas at Austin, Texas) for carefully revising the penultimate version.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.