The Development of Economics in Western Europe since 1945

The Development of Economics in Western Europe since 1945

The Development of Economics in Western Europe since 1945

The Development of Economics in Western Europe since 1945

Synopsis

This volume examines the history of economics in Europe, emphasizing historical and institutional contexts, economic policy, and the development of economics as a profession. It includes case studies of ten countries in Europe.

Excerpt

The essays in this volume embody the results of a preliminary collaborative effort to serve two distinct but interrelated purposes, namely: (1) to make a significant addition to the available knowledge of the development of economics as a discipline, science and policy profession in Western Europe since World War II; and (2) to place that development within the broader historical context of the postwar movement towards European integration. In both cases the term 'preliminary' is used advisedly with no disrespect to the authors (or, indeed, to the editor!), for this is pioneering work.

International comparative research on the post-1945 history of European economics is still a virgin field, though it is to be hoped that the recent founding of two scholarly organizations (the Annual European Conference on the History of Economics, and the European Society for the History of Economic Thought) and the launching of a new journal (The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought) may soon transform the situation. The country studies included herein have been written with the above-mentioned purposes in mind, and constitute original contributions to their respective areas. The list of European countries covered is incomplete, as attempts to extend the range of countries beyond Western Europe proved abortive. However, the concluding chapter incorporates some tentative intra-European East-West comparisons drawing on the work of Hans-Jurgen Wagener and his colleagues (infra, pp. 247-248). It seems unlikely that the addition of the nations omitted would require a substantial modification of the comparative observations made in the first and last chapters of this volume, written by the editor. In the introductory chapter there are examples of the impact of the European integration movement on the demand for economists, and supply-side influences, such as the growth of higher education; the development of postgraduate training in economics; international linkages, both intra-and extra-European; economic ideas and professionalization and involvement in economic policy-making and public affairs. The chapter ends with a brief review of some distinctive features of the country studies. In the Concluding Reflections some common themes and trends are outlined; the ten countries are subdivided (no doubt somewhat arbitrarily) into three groups; and there is a more extended consideration of the distinctive features of the policy process in the

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.