Critical Theory after Habermas: Encounters and Departures

Critical Theory after Habermas: Encounters and Departures

Critical Theory after Habermas: Encounters and Departures

Critical Theory after Habermas: Encounters and Departures

Synopsis

The essays in this book engage with the broad range of J]rgen Habermas' work including politics and the public sphere, nature, aesthetics, the linguistic turn and the paradigm of intersubjectivity. Each essay responds to particular difficulties with Habermas' approach to these topics. Each contributor also draws on different theoretical and philosophical traditions in order to explore recent developments in critical theory.

Excerpt

Reasoning, Language and Intersubjectivity
Dieter Freundlieb, Wayne Hudson, and John Rundell

Jürgen Habermas continues to be one of the most important and influential thinkers today. He has not only critiqued and extended the legacy of German critical theory, but also made lasting contributions in the areas of political and democratic theory, sociology, and law. These achievements and concerns have been accompanied by a continuing reflection on the way in which the work of critique itself may be articulated and grounded. This work, from his earliest essays on labour and interaction, to Knowledge and Human Interests, to The Theory of Communicative Action, has established a reflective foundationalism that has re-invigorated critique and reasoning and placed them at the centre of critical theory. Moreover, he has developed a multidimensional critique of modernity that has continued to address its pathologies without losing sight of its deeply imbedded positive achievements. More recently he has also made one of the most significant, ethically charged responses to the new reproductive and gene technologies in his The Future of Human Nature.

The essays in Critical Theory After Habermas: Encounters and Departures are written in critical solidarity and sympathy with Habermas' work, and address two broad areas in it that have left their long and indelible legacies for social and critical theory today. the first area pertains to the way in which Habermas distinguishes three domains of rationality under the umbrella of communicative reason, which pertain to norms, aesthetics and religion, and nature. the second set of engagements and criticisms arise from the first, that is, the status of the linguistic turn . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.