Culture and Change: Attending to Early Modern Women

Culture and Change: Attending to Early Modern Women

Culture and Change: Attending to Early Modern Women

Culture and Change: Attending to Early Modern Women

Synopsis

This is the fourth in the series of proceedings of the interdisciplinary conference sponsored by the Center for Renaissance & Baroque Studies at the University of Maryland. This volume reflects the commitment of scholars to the exploration of early modern

Excerpt

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies was established in 1981 through the vision of Dr. Shirley S. Kenny, then provost of arts and humanities at the University of Maryland, and the beneficence of the Maryland legislature during an all-too-familiar period of retrenchment in higher education. It held its inaugural conference on March 11—12, 1982. From the outset, the university has envisaged the Center as multidisciplinary. Music and the visual arts, theater, literatures in several modern European and Asian languages, philosophy, the history of science, and history—indeed, all the appropriate disciplines in the humanistic pantheon—come within the Center's domain. Throughout the academic year, the Center engages the university community, the wider educational community in Maryland, and cultural institutions with a lively program of interdisciplinary symposia, public lectures, and colloquia. In addition, the Center also has ongoing partnerships with many Maryland school districts and individual schools and offers statewide and national professional development programs for secondary school teachers of the humanities and performing arts. These secondary school teachers are always included in the audience of other events as well.

On November 9—11, 2000, scholars gathered in College Park for the fourth symposium sponsored by the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies on the lives and productions of early modern women. On this occasion, they convened to consider the future of scholarship on early modern women and to explore the topics of early modern women's stories, the goods that women made, consumed, and traded, and early modern women's spiritualities both within organized religions and within the domestic sphere. A plenary session on pedagogy allowed scholars to probe the relationship of their students to the scholarship on early modern women and to record, in passing, the contributions of students to that scholarship. This volume recaptures the excitement and energy of the symposium by bringing together the plenary papers, keynote address, and workshops that filled three crowded days.

The essays collected here, contributed by scholars of literature, history, Jewish studies, musicology, and art history, raise crucial questions about the . . .

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