Purified by Blood: Honour Killings Amongst Turks in the Netherlands

Purified by Blood: Honour Killings Amongst Turks in the Netherlands

Purified by Blood: Honour Killings Amongst Turks in the Netherlands

Purified by Blood: Honour Killings Amongst Turks in the Netherlands

Synopsis

Honor killings—murders carried out to cleanse tarnished family honor or chastity—have long been reported as significant problems in the heart of the Muslim world. It is also a widely known phenomenon in Turkey, where an average of six such killings is reported per month, and with Turkish migration to Western Europe since the 1960s, these murders have been reported in the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, and Denmark. Clementine van Eck's incisive study examines twenty such murders committed in the Netherlands, focusing particular attention on the social factors that play a role in the decision to commit an honor killing.

Excerpt

When I graduated from the Catholic University Nijmegen as a cultural anthropologist and embarked on Turkish Studies at Leiden University, my lecturers Dick Koopman and Ane Nauta drew my attention to the topic, `honour killings among Turks in the Netherlands'. They assumed — quite correctly — that the subject would interest me as a cultural anthropologist. It is an area in which they had been working since the 1970s, following regular approaches from the courts and the police with requests for information. I would like to thank them for bringing the subject to my notice. I especially wish to thank Ane Nauta, with whom I had various discussions — during my Turkish studies — about honour killing cases on which he had been asked to give his opinion as an expert witness.

Unfortunately, it was not possible within the Turkish Department to devote a thesis to honour killings, but in 1995 I had an opportunity to research this topic at the Amsterdam School for Social Science Research, Amsterdam University. This is one of the few research schools in the Netherlands that allows you to write your doctoral thesis on a subject of your own choice. Anton Blok of Amsterdam University and Henk Driessen of the Catholic University Nijmegen were excellent supervisors. In addition, members of the doctoral students' anthropology group (the `anthropology club') at the Amsterdam School for Social Science Research provided me with useful feedback. I also wish to thank Johan Goudsblom for helping to assess my interim papers. Matthijs van den Bos, Frank Bovenkerk, Lenie Brouwer, Martin van Bruinessen, Léon Buskens, Remco Ensel, Dick Koopman, Cees Maris, Ruud Peters, Wibo van Rossum, Hermine Wiersinga and Erik-Jan Zürcher all provided me with useful commentary. Aspha Bijnaar, Mieke Komen and Geertje van Os helped not just with matters of substance, but gave me moral support as well. I would like to thank the librarians at the University Library in Leiden, who were always happy to conduct literature searches for me.

I wish to extend my gratitude to a number of people in Turkey: the late Osman Badrasli, for providing me with the Bitlis case studies (see appendix II); his daughter Övgü, who trained as a librarian in . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.