Keeping Your Valuable Employees: Retention Strategies for Your Organization's Most Important Resource

Keeping Your Valuable Employees: Retention Strategies for Your Organization's Most Important Resource

Keeping Your Valuable Employees: Retention Strategies for Your Organization's Most Important Resource

Keeping Your Valuable Employees: Retention Strategies for Your Organization's Most Important Resource

Synopsis

The Essential Guide to the Most Crucial Challenge Facing Twenty-First Century Human Resources Management "This book offers a practical, realistic approach to keeping the best employees. It draws on good theory and offers excellent advice." -Dave Ulrich, Professor of Business, University of Michigan, and coauthor of Organizational Capability "Business owners who agonize over attracting and retaining employees will find a wealth of information. Suzanne understands how to apply today's best ideas in human resources management to businesses large and small." -E. Jill Pollock, President, Pollock Consulting Group, Inc., and Chair, Small Business Association of Michigan "A two-year Gallup study found that companies with a positive workforce reported higher profits, productivity, and lower turnover. Every organization would like these results. Suzanne shares her human resources experience and provides hands-on tools for retaining those people who are key to an organization's success. It is an easy-to-read, practical guide for working with today's and tomorrow's employees." -Hunter A. Pickens, President, The Pickens Group, Ltd.

Excerpt

There is a new, twenty-first century employment relationship. It is an updated version of the nineteenth century idea that employer and employee can negotiate the terms of work on an even footing. In actuality, at that earlier time the power was with the employer. An individual refusing to accept the terms of employment did not have a job. The new employment relationship gives employees at least as much power as employers.

This makes recruitment hard and retention even more difficult. An example:

You interview a promising candidate for a hard-to-fill position. She does well on the structured interview. She listens carefully and takes notes as you describe your company's very competitive salaries, outstanding benefits, and vast array of services. Then she asks:

“What will you do to retain me?”

You describe, again, your educational assistance program, commitment to 40 hours of training per employee per year, job posting system, and fitness center.

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