Learning & Teaching for Business: Case Studies of Successful Innovation

Learning & Teaching for Business: Case Studies of Successful Innovation

Learning & Teaching for Business: Case Studies of Successful Innovation

Learning & Teaching for Business: Case Studies of Successful Innovation

Synopsis

This collection of best practice examples of business teaching will inspire and inform those involved in the improvement of teaching in Higher Education. Assembled by the Learning and Teaching Support Network the examples are drawn from institutions throughout the UK including: The Open University, Sheffield Hallam, City University, St Andrews, Brighton, De Montford, Liverpool John Moores, Glasgow, Leeds Met and Plymouth. While individual case studies focus on everything from the use of action learning, resource based learning, using technology and peer assessment to the development of a knowledge management system.

Excerpt

Educating people for the effective management of enterprises is a more and more important activity. This is evidenced in many ways-but two examples are the great rise in demand for this kind of education over the last 30 years or so, and current government concern that management inadequacy lies at the heart of the UK's productivity problems. What is done in business education has also changed substantially during this period and continues to change. Thirty years ago management training centres focussed on developing management capabilities, while universities, if they taught business and management at all, taught the principles of economics and psychology using the traditional methodologies of lectures, books and written, unseen examinations. But now, skills and knowledge are both seen to be important to management education in management education establishments of all kinds: the traditional education methods have been superseded by student-centred learning-a move from sage-on-the-stage to guide-at-the-side; new kinds of assessment methods have been increasingly employed-to be formative as well as summative; and information technology is making many new learning methods possible.

In this environment, experiments in business education have been developed in many different parts of the higher and further education system. Some of these have been motivated by a need to achieve improved cost efficiency-a very strong pressure in British universities and colleges in the last decade. Others have been designed to improve learning outcomes-perhaps driven by teaching quality audits. While these may have helped the institution in which they were developed, other institutions may well gain from using them as well. This is the issue addressed by this very welcome volume. BEST is the organization set up by the UK Learning and Teaching Support Network (which is funded by the Funding Councils for Higher Education) to support the development and dissemination of good practice in teaching management and business studies and accounting. BEST carried out a detailed search process and identified the 12 innovations described in this book as worthy of description for a wider audience.

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