Lessons from Mount Kilimanjaro: Schooling, Community, and Gender in East Africa

Lessons from Mount Kilimanjaro: Schooling, Community, and Gender in East Africa

Lessons from Mount Kilimanjaro: Schooling, Community, and Gender in East Africa

Lessons from Mount Kilimanjaro: Schooling, Community, and Gender in East Africa

Synopsis

An ethnographic study of a school and community in East Africa focusing on the role school plays in the development of the children's identity and relationships to their parents and community, as well as in the development of the region.

Excerpt

“Why are we selling our land and cows to send our children to secondary school? I really don't understand it, ” asserted Joshua Makia, a seventy-year-old man living on Mount Kilimanjaro.

“Yes, ” responded Mzee Lema, “we've given up everything so that our sons-even our daughters!-can go to school.”

October 1991

“These educated girls think they can come back and rule the roost! We pay for their uniforms and school fees, and then they come and tell us we are no good, that we are backward and traditional.”

Mama Angela, mother of a secondary school graduate, living on Mount Kilimanjaro. January 1993

“Education is the best thing we can give our sons and daughters. Without education, our children are nothing. With education, they can talk to the world.They can get jobs and move out of the village.”

Baba Elimbora, father of three secondary school students, who lives on Mount Kilimanjaro and works much of the year in Nairobi, Kenya. October 1996

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